Geography

History of the Midwest Region of Brazil


During the sixteenth, seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, with the aim of discovering gold and precious stones, the bandeirantes, starting from the village of São Paulo, began the occupation of the Midwest, which was previously an area almost forgotten by the colonists.

The cities of Cuiabá, Rosario do Oeste, Diamantino and Paconé in Mato Grosso, and Goiás, Luziânia, Rio Verde and Jaraguá in the state of Goiás, emerged with mining.


Landmarks in the center of Cuiaba: 15 de Novembro Square, Mato Grosso Historical Museum, Instruction Palace and Cathedral

Military fortifications gave rise to the city of Corumbá in Mato Grosso do Sul and Cárceres in the state of Mato Grosso.


Corumbá Fort, on the banks of the Paraguay River

In 1890, the military man Marechal Cândido Rondon, born in Mato Grosso, of indigenous origin, commanded the construction of a telegraph line between Cuiabá and the Araguaia River region, which was later extended to Goiás.

In 1914, the Novoeste Railroad was inaugurated, leaving Bauru (SP) to Corumbá in Mato Grosso do Sul.

 
Railroad map of the Novoeste railroad connecting Sao Paulo to Corumbá

Goiânia, the capital of Goiás, designed and built to house a population of 50,000 people, was founded in 1937. To stimulate the growth of the Midwest Region, in 1940, the federal government created two colonization areas: the Colony. Dourados, south of Campo Grande, and the Goiás Colony, north of Goiânia.


Photographic record of the first settlers in Dourados

The inauguration of Brasilia, the country's capital, in the year 1960, by President Juscelino Kubitschek, attracted migrants from all over Brazil.


Photographic record of the inauguration of Brasilia / DF