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Uncovering Ancient Pyramid Science at Teotihuacan, Where Men Become Gods

Uncovering Ancient Pyramid Science at Teotihuacan, Where Men Become Gods



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Teotihuacan’s Lost Kings , a television special, took an hour long look at the great city, its inhabitants, and the excavation of the Temple of Quetzalcoatl, (also known as the Feathered Serpent Pyramid.) The program revealed evidence of advanced engineering built into a tunnel system, and placed directly underneath the Pyramid. As a team excavated the tunnels, viewers witnessed what must be considered the interior of an ancient generator, where combinations of chemical, mineral, water (and possible electromagnetic fields) were introduced into chambers, resulting in some form of energy. How and where this energy was delivered is still unknown, but based on the design of the complex, we can now speculate as to how the entire facility may have operated.

Note that I have purposely called Teotihuacan a facility, as this is exactly what it was and not a city as many have speculated.

Here’s their amazing discovery.

Aerial view of Teotihuacan, Mexico. ( Gian /Adobe Stock)

Mysterious Tunnel

In 2003, Archaeologist Sergio Gomez was walking by the Temple of Quetzalcoatl, when he noticed a large crack in the ground approximately 20 feet (six meters) from the foot of the stairs. Recent rains had opened a surface area, leaving a noticeable divot and exposing tourists to possible injury. Gomez, who had worked at Teotihuacan for over 30 years, inspected the site and determined that something curious lay underneath. Teotihuacan is considered an archaeological park and most archaeologists know that every square foot of land can hold artifacts and important evidence to the past history of the area.

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Gomez, a member of the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH), received permission to investigate the area, and later that year assembled a team of experts who began carefully removing surface debris. Archaeological excavation is a slow process and as they worked their way down they uncovered a round shaft, similar to a well, perfectly crafted of cement and stone.

Archaeologist Sergio Gomez is lowered into a perfectly formed stone and cement well shaft that passes underground 14 feet and opens to a deep cavern. At the time of the pyramid’s assembly, the shaft may have delivered a combination of water and chemicals which reacted directly underneath the pyramid, delivering its charge to nearby pods. (PBS TV, Teotihuacan’s Lost King’s. Screenshot via Youtube)

Unknowingly, they’d uncovered the main access point to the original design of the complex that dropped down over 40 feet (12 meters). As they descended down into the shaft which opened into a cavern, they cleared over 400 tons of dirt, debris, and portions of discarded buildings, carefully looking for artifacts.

Cliff Dunning will be discussing Maya Pyramid Science at the Ancient Hi-Tech Uncovered conference April 24-25, 2021. Get your ticket HERE!

Once in the cavern they noticed the space had been carefully cut out of solid bedrock and opened into a large tunnel. Before the team began removing the debris that blocked entry to the tunnel, Gomez had the space laser-scanned to determine its depth and other clues to its formation. The scans returned images of a precisely cut tunnel that ran more than 330 feet (100 meters) under the pyramid. The scans also revealed odd pockets or small repositories that dropped down from the main shaft and which had the appearance of small rooms.

As the team began to excavate the tunnel, they made the first of many discoveries of artifacts and tools left by those they reasoned were the builders. At the 100-foot mark (30 meters), over 50,000 artifacts were recovered, leading the team to consider a royal tomb was close by.

A portion of the main tunnel with evidence of high water mark, reaching the top. The tunnel is divided into sub-chambers, (noted by the very dark sub-walls) where perhaps heavy metals fell and were contained in mixing stations before delivering a charge or chemical reaction to a central area directly underneath the pyramid. Archaeologists appear to be completely unaware of the unknown science that once may have played a role in the pyramid complex. (Source: DigitalJournal)

Strange Pyrite Spheres Discovered

The excavation team also found the first of a number of chemical and mineral deposits buried in the dirt. Hundreds of golden spheres were uncovered in various states of decomposition. They were composed of Pyrite (Fool’s Gold) and a mixture of adobe and crushed rock.

A very rare, very fine pyrite ball, from Peru. (Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com / CC BY-SA 3.0 )

Gomez had also noticed that the walls were covered in pyrite, which gave off a strange glow-in-the-dark effect in the unlit portions of the tunnel. Careful to check the remaining area, Gomez requested another laser scan of the tunnel to determine what lay ahead. To his surprise, the shafts ended in a cross-shaped enclosure, the center positioned directly under the highest point of the pyramid.

3D laser scan created by a drone shows that depth and length of the tunnel carved into solid bedrock. The small cavities (lower spaces) in the tunnel may have been chemical mixing chambers as evidence by the water, pyrite, mercury, and radon gas that was discovered. (Source: La Razón )

As of this writing, the excavation continues in an attempt to discover a royal tomb, but there are a number of critical discoveries which point to the actual purpose of the tunnel system. First, it’s believed the artifacts and offerings were left by the people who rediscovered Teotihuacan over 1,800 years ago and had nothing to do with the original design of the system. A number of important clues offer us a glimpse of the original intent of the pyramid complex and other components which make up this discovery.

Geomagnetic Fields and Pyramids

Recent discoveries in ancient pyramid engineering have suggested that a large number were designed as some form of energy generators by different cultures around the world. In some locations, including Central and South America, construction techniques appear to have been shared.

John Burke, a businessman and scientist, made an important discovery on pyramid electromagnetic energy in 2005. Burke had detected geo-magnetic discharge at a number of North American and European megalithic and mound sites, including Stonehenge, The Serpent Mound in Ohio, and a variety of smaller stone enclosures up and down the eastern coastlines. Using state-of-the-art scanning equipment, including a Magnetometer and Electrostatic Voltmeter, he was able to determine that each location had been chosen because of its naturally occurring telluric energy field that pulsed up and into the structure or surrounding area.

What these sites were used for is anyone’s guess, but we now understand that they may have a positive effect on human physiology and greatly enhanced crop seeds. What’s baffling is how the builders knew how to find the telluric fields without scanning equipment?

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Sensing there might be more to electromagnetic energy enhancement, Burke begin scanning pyramid complexes in Central America which were designed with a high level of precision. He would eventually learn about a specific pyramid at Tikal, an ancient Maya city in Guatemala, which was used by the local farmers to enhance their seeds. Known as The Mundo Perdido (Spanish for "Lost World") Pyramid, and considered one of the oldest pyramids in the entire complex (600 BC).

Burke and his research partner Kaj Halberg discovered electro-magnetic signatures that measured impressive charges on top of the pyramid. In a series of scans, the readings showed an average change of 908 volts over a short period of time, which was concentrated in the early morning hours. Burke mentions the readings and states, “These voltages might sound lethal and if it were a household current they could be. However, static electric charge in the air is a different type of electricity and even a thousand volts is not dangerous.” His discovery of pyramid field generation is fascinating, but what he actually uncovered was a means of generating and perhaps distributing electromagnetic energy within a pyramid complex.

Mundo Perdido (The Lost World) Pyramid at Tikal, Guatemala. ( Anton Ivanov Photo /Adobe Stock)

What we don’t know about the Lost World Pyramid is if it has other components built into its construction, similar to the Pyramid of the Serpent. We now understand that at a number of Maya pyramids there are key components designed into their construction that act as magnifiers. These components appear to be important in the creation, magnification, and distribution of telluric fields:

  1. Water, either moving naturally including rivers or cenotes (found at El Castillo at Chichen Itza) or by artificial canals or tunnels, similar to the Temple of Inscription found at Palenque.)
  2. Geo-magnetic fields. Naturally formed telluric fields that have high and low period throughout day and night.
  3. Pyramid design. The specific pyramid shape appears to greatly enhance the telluric fields that pulse up and into the center of the chamber.
  4. Pyramid interior fill. At a number of pyramids, rocks that are good electromagnetic conductors fill the interior of the pyramids and are used to enhance the pulsing field. Rocks that have veins with quartz, granite, and other electrical conducting properties appear to be favored.

The chemical and mineral discoveries that Gomez made at Pyramid of the Serpent have many of the same properties found at Maya pyramid locations, with a few twists.

What Made the Pyramid Run?

As Gomez and his team were excavating the tunnel, they discovered water marks high up on the wall. The mark runs the entire length of the tunnel, indicating the space would constantly fill with water. The marks are almost black and appear to have been etched with some chemical concentrate.

The transportation of water was delivered through the stone well shaft from the surface and directed to flow over specific regions of the tunnel.

Director of the excavation, Sergio Gomez, inspects a portion of a stone wall found throughout the tunnel. A high water mark that covers the entire tunnel and cavern area are evidence that water was an important ingredient in some chemical reaction. (Source: TheYucatanTimes)

Recent discoveries of mineral and chemical residue and the design of the well shaft, cavern, and tunnel system, allow one to conclude that the underground system was designed to create some type of discharge which may have taken place in the small chamber that leads to the main cross-shaped configuration at the end of the tunnel.

This discovery of water, minerals, and chemicals has never been a consideration of Gomez or the other archaeologists, whose main goal is excavating the tunnel. In the last few years, the following chemicals and mineral combinations have been uncovered in large quantities throughout the tunnel system.

Pyrite and pools of mercury have been uncovered, and a few years ago, Radon gas was detected passing through a number of areas of the tunnels, requiring workers to wear protective breathing gear. If you combine these elements and a geomagnetic telluric field, the effect may be many times what was detected by Burke at the Lost World pyramid. This is a profound discovery.

An ancient, unknown science designed to create energy directed up and into the pyramid is fascinating to consider and must be analyzed further. Unfortunately, we’re left with more questions than answers. Who were the builders of Teotihuacan?

Serpentine Mask, Teotihuacán, 200-500 AD. ( CC BY-SA 3.0 )


Photos: The Amazing Pyramids of Teotihuacan

Teotihuacan (pronounced te-o-tee-waka-n) is believed by archeologists to be the first major city of the Americas. It was located in the northeastern region of the Valley of Mexico, some 35 miles (56 kilometers) from modern Mexico City. It existed from about 100 B.C. to A.D. 550.

At its prime, Teotihuacan was about 14 square miles, (36 square km), in size and was home to a variety of native people from many different regions, including the Maya, Mixtec and Zapotec. By A.D. 400, Teotihuacan was the most densely populated city in all the Americas with a population of more than 100,000 individuals.


Original offering found at Teotihuacan pyramid

Archaeologists announced Tuesday that they dug to the very core of Mexico's tallest pyramid and found what may be the original ceremonial offering placed on the site of the Pyramid of the Sun before construction began.

The offerings found at the base of the pyramid in the Teotihuacan ruin site just north of Mexico City include a green serpentine stone mask so delicately carved and detailed that archaeologists believe it may have been a portrait.

The find also includes 11 ceremonial clay pots dedicated to a rain god similar to Tlaloc, who was still worshipped in the area 1,500 years later, according to a statement by the National Institute of Anthropology and History, or INAH.

The offerings, including bones of an eagle fed rabbits as well as feline and canine animals that haven't yet been identified, were laid on a sort of rubble base where the temple was erected about A.D. 50.

"We know that it was deposited as part of a consecration ritual for the construction of the Pyramid of the Sun," said INAH archaeologist Enrique Perez Cortes.

Experts followed an old tunnel dug through the pyramid by researchers in the 1930s that narrowly missed the center, and then dug small extensions and exploratory shafts off it.

What they found points to the earliest days of the still largely mysterious Teotihuacan culture.

The remains of three structures that predate the pyramid were found buried at the base. Archaeologists have known that the ceremonial significance of the site, perhaps as a "link" to the underworld, predates the pyramids.

They also found seven burials, some of them infant remains.

Susan Gillespie, an associate professor of anthropology at the University of Florida who was not involved in the project, called the find "exciting and important, although I would not say it was unexpected" given that dedicatory offerings were commonly placed in MesoAmerican pyramids.

"It is exciting that what looks like the original foundation dedicatory cache for what was to become the largest (in height) pyramid in Mexico (and one of the largest in the world) has finally been found, after much concerted efforts looking for it," Gillespie wrote in an email.

She said the find gives a better picture of the continuity of religious practices during Teotihuacan's long history. Some of the same themes found in the offering are repeated in ancient murals painted on the city's walls centuries later.

George Cowgill, an anthropologist at Arizona State University, called the find "pretty important" and suggested the Tlaloc offerings may thicken the debate about whether the pyramid was linked to the sun, the underworld or Tlaloc, who was also considered a war god.

"The discovery of seven humans suggests that they were probably sacrificial victims, along with several species of fierce animals," Cowgill wrote.

The city was founded nearly 2,500 years ago and came to have a dominant influence in architecture, trade and cultural in large swaths of ancient Mexico. But the identity of its rulers remains a mystery, and the city was abandoned by the time the Aztecs arrived in the area in the 1300s and gave it the name Teotihuacan, which means "the place where men become gods."

©2011 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


Mexico State Today

Chief industries in the state include food processing, construction, motor vehicles, chemicals, textiles, paper, machinery and assembly industries, electric and electronic equipment and appliances. Companies such as Chrysler, Ford, Nissan, Hoechst, Pfizer and Motorola operate more than 20 industrial complexes throughout the state.

The pyramids at Teotihuacán have become an international tourist destination, thanks in part to the ancient city’s designation as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1987. Visitors to the area’s parks, wildlife preserves and museums also provide significant state revenue.

Both large and small farms in the state grow a variety of fruits and staple crops, including mango, avocado, orange, plum, nuts, mamey (similar to an apricot), papaya, corn, wheat, alfalfa, maguey cactus, tomatoes and beans.


Teotihuacán

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Teotihuacán, (Nahuatl: “The City of the Gods”) the most important and largest city of pre-Aztec central Mexico, located about 30 miles (50 km) northeast of modern Mexico City. At its apogee (c. 500 ce ), it encompassed some 8 square miles (20 square km) and supported a population estimated at 125,000–200,000, making it, at the time, one of the largest cities in the world. It was the region’s major economic as well as religious centre. Teotihuacán was designated a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1987.

The area was settled by 400 bce , but it did not experience large-scale urban growth until three centuries later, with the arrival of refugees from Cuicuilco, a city destroyed by volcanic activity. It is not known whether the basic urban plan also dates to that time. About 750 ce central Teotihuacán burned, possibly during an insurrection or a civil war. Although parts of the city were occupied after that event, much of it fell into ruin. Centuries later the area was revered by Aztec pilgrims.

The origin and language of the Teotihuacanos are yet unknown. Their cultural influences spread throughout Mesoamerica, and the city carried on trade with distant regions. Perhaps two-thirds of the urban population were involved in farming the surrounding fields. Others worked with ceramics or obsidian, a volcanic glass that was used for weapons, tools, and ornamentation. The city also had large numbers of merchants, many of whom had immigrated there from great distances. The priest-rulers who governed the city also staged grand religious pageants and ceremonies that often involved human sacrifices.

In addition to some 2,000 single-story apartment compounds, the ruined city contains great plazas, temples, a canalized river, and palaces of nobles and priests. The main buildings are connected by a 130-foot- (40-metre-) wide road, the Avenue of the Dead (“Calle de los Muertos”), that stretches 1.5 miles (2.4 km) oriented slightly east of true north, it points directly at the nearby sacred peak of Cerro Gordo. The Avenue of the Dead was once erroneously thought to have been lined with tombs, but the low buildings that flank it probably were palace residences.

The north end of the Avenue of the Dead is capped by the Pyramid of the Moon and flanked by platforms and lesser pyramids. The second largest structure in the city, the Pyramid of the Moon rises to 140 feet (43 metres) and measures 426 by 511 feet (130 by 156 metres) at its base. Its main stairway faces the Avenue of the Dead.

Along the southern part of the avenue lies the Ciudadela (“Citadel”), a large square courtyard covering 38 acres (15 hectares). Within the Citadel stands the Temple of Quetzalcóatl (the Feathered Serpent) in the form of a truncated pyramid projecting from its ornately decorated walls are numerous stone heads of the deity. The temple walls were once painted in hematite red. Excavations of the Citadel were first carried out during the period 1917–20. Individual burial sites were found around the temple in 1925, and in the early 1980s archaeologists discovered the ceremonially interred remains of 18 men, probably soldiers who had been ritually sacrificed. Carbon-14 dating indicated that the graves were prepared about 200 ce . Further work has revealed more than 130 skeletons of both sexes in mass graves along the edges of the temple, as well as beneath it.

The Pyramid of the Sun is one of the largest structures of its type in the Western Hemisphere. It dominates the central city from the east side of the Avenue of the Dead. The pyramid rises 216 feet (66 metres) above ground level, and it measures approximately 720 by 760 feet (220 by 230 metres) at its base. It was constructed of about 1,000,000 cubic yards (765,000 cubic metres) of material, including hewed tezontle, a red coarse volcanic rock of the region. During hastily organized restoration work in 1905–10, the architect Leopoldo Batres arbitrarily added a fifth terrace level to the structure, and many of its original facing stones were removed. In the early 1970s exploration below the pyramid revealed a system of cave and tunnel chambers. Over subsequent years other tunnels were revealed throughout the city, and it was suggested that much of the building stone of Teotihuacán was mined there.

The city was initially excavated in 1884. In the 1960s and ’70s the first systematic survey (the Teotihuacán Mapping Project) was led by the American archaeologist René Millon, and hundreds of workers in 1980–82 excavated under the direction of the Mexican archaeologist Rubén Cabrera Castro. Work in the 1990s focused on the city’s subterranean tunnels and on the apartment compounds, which were found to be decorated with vividly painted murals. Long-standing threats to the greater area of ruins are posed by human habitation (including five towns), numerous shops, roads and highways, and a military base. Many neighbourhoods excavated in the late 20th century had been earlier cultivated by farmers. See also pre-Columbian civilizations: Teotihuacán.


Scans

In a series of scans, the readings showed an average also change of 908 volts over a short period of time. Which was concentrated in the early morning hours. Burke mentions the readings and states, “These also voltages might sound lethal. And if it were a household current they could be. However, static electric charge in the air is a different. Type of electricity and even a thousand volts is not dangerous. His discovery of pyramid field generation is fascinating. But what he actually uncovered was a means of generating and perhaps distributing electomagnetic energy within a pyramid complex.

What we don’t know about the Lost World Pyramid is if it has other components built into its construction. Similar to the Pyramid of the Serpent. We now understand that at a number also of Maya pyramids there are key components. Designed into their construction that act as magnifiers. These components appear to be important in the creation, magnification and distribution of telluric fields:

Water, either moving naturally including rivers or cenotes (found at El. Castillo at Chichen Itza) or by artificial canals or tunnels, similar to the Temple of Inscription found at Palenque.)


Geomagnetic Fields and Pyramids

Recent discoveries in ancient pyramid engineering have suggested that a large number were designed as some form of energy generators by different cultures around the world. In some locations, including Central and South America, construction techniques appear to have been shared.

John Burke, a businessman and scientist, made an important discovery on pyramid electromagnetic energy in 2005. Burke had detected geo-magnetic discharge at a number of North American and European megalithic and mound sites, including Stonehenge, The Serpent Mound in Ohio, and a variety of smaller stone enclosures up and down the eastern coastlines. Using state-of-the-art scanning equipment, including a Magnetometer and Electrostatic Voltmeter, he was able to determine that each location had been chosen because of its naturally occurring telluric energy field that pulsed up and into the structure or surrounding area.

What these sites were used for is anyone’s guess, but we now understand that they may have a positive effect on human physiology and greatly enhanced crop seeds. What’s baffling is how the builders knew how to find the telluric fields without scanning equipment?

Sensing there might be more to electromagnetic energy enhancement, Burke begin scanning pyramid complexes in Central America which were designed with a high level of precision. He would eventually learn about a specific pyramid at Tikal, an ancient Maya city in Guatemala, which was used by the local farmers to enhance their seeds. Known as The Mundo Perdido (Spanish for “Lost World”) Pyramid, and considered one of the oldest pyramids in the entire complex (600 BC).

Burke and his research partner Kaj Halberg discovered electro-magnetic signatures that measured impressive charges on top of the pyramid. In a series of scans, the readings showed an average change of 908 volts over a short period of time, which was concentrated in the early morning hours. Burke mentions the readings and states, “These voltages might sound lethal and if it were a household current they could be. However, static electric charge in the air is a different type of electricity and even a thousand volts is not dangerous.” His discovery of pyramid field generation is fascinating, but what he actually uncovered was a means of generating and perhaps distributing electromagnetic energy within a pyramid complex.

Mundo Perdido (The Lost World) Pyramid at Tikal, Guatemala. ( Anton Ivanov Photo /Adobe Stock)

What we don’t know about the Lost World Pyramid is if it has other components built into its construction, similar to the Pyramid of the Serpent. We now understand that at a number of Maya pyramids there are key components designed into their construction that act as magnifiers. These components appear to be important in the creation, magnification, and distribution of telluric fields:

  1. Water, either moving naturally including rivers or cenotes (found at El Castillo at Chichen Itza) or by artificial canals or tunnels, similar to the Temple of Inscription found at Palenque.)
  2. Geo-magnetic fields. Naturally formed telluric fields that have high and low period throughout day and night.
  3. Pyramid design. The specific pyramid shape appears to greatly enhance the telluric fields that pulse up and into the center of the chamber.
  4. Pyramid interior fill. At a number of pyramids, rocks that are good electromagnetic conductors fill the interior of the pyramids and are used to enhance the pulsing field. Rocks that have veins with quartz, granite, and other electrical conducting properties appear to be favored.

The chemical and mineral discoveries that Gomez made at Pyramid of the Serpent have many of the same properties found at Maya pyramid locations, with a few twists.


Hugh Harleston Jr.

One of the foremost metrologists of Teotihuacán is, without equivocation, Dr. Hugh Harleston Jr., who during the late 1960s and 1970s measured this “ritual city” from a “…unified geometrical composition whose intervals are clearly defined, and Harleston was soon able to establish the basic unit of measure in its dimensions. This proved to be a unit of 1.0594 meters, which Harleston called the Standard Teotihuacán Unit (STU) or Hunab after the Mayan word, adopted by the Aztecs, for Measure. He also recognized the geodetic significance of that unit: 1.0594063 meters is equivalent to the ‘Jewish rod’ of 3.4757485 ft., the same unit which represents the width of the Stonehenge lintels, a six-millionth part of the earth’s polar radius and one part in 37,800,000 of its mean circumference.” (Ref. The New View Over Atlantis, Dr. John Michell, 1995, p. 131).

Also: “Harleston says of Teotihuacan’s builders: ‘When they draw a line, they’re telling you an area. When they draw an area, they’re telling you a volume. When they put volume, they’re telling you time.’”

So, what we’re dealing with here are ultimately three fundamental metrologies (with the Imperial Mile/Foot and the meter thrown in for their ubiquitous usage) – Firstly, Dr. Harleston with the STUs or the Standard Teotihuacán Unit of measurement being in feet – the aforesaid 3.4757485 ft. = 1 STU (which Harleston claims is the measurement of the Jewish Sacred Rod and dubbed the Hunab (Mayan for “measure”)…and that this Hunab measurement was used among the ancients in measuring their objects throughout the Earth).

Secondly, the Sumerian basic unit which is measured in “shusi” of 0.66”, link of 12 shusi (7.92”), foot of 20 shusi (13.2”) cubit of 30 shusi (19.8”), yard of 50 shusi (33.0”), etc. – whereas the “Sumerian Foot” is, as stated, 13.2” (or 1.1’) and as the “S.F.” or “s.f” – therefore, 10 s.f. are calculated 10 * 13.2” = 132” or 132”/12” = 11’. Thirdly, the unit developed by Saburo Sugiyama dubbed the TMU or Teotihuacán Measuring Unit which is 2.69’ or 32.68” or 83 cm.

In the above colorful map we observe the commencement of the measurements of the brilliant team of Dr. Hugh Harleston Jr. – whose conclusions, however, leave something to be desired insofar as “some” of the overall dimensions of the Citadel concern, but when meshed with those of “Allen’s team” of GPS Sumerian units, they confirm a number of our suspicions that the site of the Citadel’s platform is truly 1,320’ x 1,320’ (not a quadrilateral-four-sided rectangle but a quadrilateral-four-sided square).

The drawing above was made in 1998 (after many years of research and measurement – I hasten to add). Please note the “Saturn” structure (i.e., the Citadel) to be 378 STU x 396 STUs (Standard Teotihuacán Units of 3.4757485 ft. or 378 * 3.4757485 ft. = 1,313.832933’ x 1,376.39641’ (irregular and oddly enough very much larger than the 1,320’ x 1,265’ S.F.(Sumerian Foot measurement of 1,200 s.f. x 1,150 s.f. of the Citadel platform)) measurements. Oddly enough, it appears Harleston may have inadvertently placed a 378 STU on the other side of the Avenue of the Dead in “front” of the Citadel – therefore, in the front he has 378 STU, 378 STU on the sides but 396 in the back of the Citadel. Later, Harleston, as you will see, determined that the site was square at 378 STU x 378 STU.

Harleston’s Citadel measurements in feet are different from our “intended measurement” of 1,320’ x 1,320’ (i.e., 1,313.832933’ by 1,313.832933’ if using 378 STU x 378 STU). You will find, as I, that Harleston’s metrologies bear outstanding proportional integration, consistency and inter-relationships by capturing the overall design by the original and subsequent developers of the site/structures in building a metrological system.

He, as we, confirm their intentions were not random placements but were by design intended to convey astronomical, calendrical, and, especially cosmological meaning (herein we place their religious and/or spiritual implications and extrapolate them to the measurements of the New Jerusalem of John the Beloved, and exemplified within the geometry of the New Jerusalem Diagram, which, in the main, is a superb and most dynamic expression of celestial realities).

Again, the above map was drawn in 1998 by Dr. Hugh Harleston, Jr. Now, I must tell you that these irregularities among these metrologies – especially these three metrologists (Harleston, Sugiyama, and the Allen-GPS Team/Synthesis) have been chosen from a somewhat vast pool of metrologists (there are others as well).

These metrologists appear to be the most diligent and comprehensive in their measurements and conclusions although sometimes their measurements are skewed in order to conform to their particular “systems”, they are, nevertheless, done with a sincerity of purpose altogether admirable insofar as the science of metrology and cosmology concern.

We may differ with them in our interpretation – but we must admire them for their supreme efforts in relating to the general public the immensity of their discoveries under strenuous conditions – some having accomplished this herculean fete of measurement for nigh half a century!

In 2001 the Harleston team came out with these metrologies on their 3-D map (above) – again, using the STU as their standard unit of measurement however, please note to the right/facing that the Citadel’s measurements have been decreased to 378 x 378 STU (not 378 x 396) or 378 * 3.4757485’ = 1,313.832933’ x 1,313.832933’ just shy of our 1,320’ x 1,320’ or 6.167067’ on both dimensions however, they have “squared” the Citadel platform – whereas, the Atlantisbolivia site (Allen) has remained irregular and created a rectangle at best or simply an irregular sided quadrilateral, not a four-square platform. However, that said – and while admiring the proportional symmetry of the city’s platform and structures – we are, nevertheless, befuddled that in order to achieve his overall length of 2,268 STU (observe the 936 + 936 + 396 = 2,268 STU and securing his 3:1 ratio in its width as 756 STU (see backside of the Pyramid of the Moon measurement) wherein 756 STU/2 (1/2 on each side of its axis or Avenue of the Dead) = 378 STU (which is the same measurement on the base square sides of the Citadel at 378 STU x 378 STU however, the 396 STU behind the Citadel “appears” to agree with the measurement of the 378 STU…but that cannot be. Therefore, we assume that the 396 STU measurement must extend to both sides of the Citadel with the greater balance of the difference (396 STU less 378 STU = 18 STU) on the “southern side” of the Citadel – a slight technicality, however, 18 STU is 18 * 3.4757485’ = 62.563473 Linear Feet…no small “fete” – but unequivocally the Citadel is a square.

Dr. Harleston has been at this a very long time. One must realize that excavation, simultaneously, has been going on throughout the complex – changing the overall measurements therefore, he has tried to be as accurate as he can be with his team of researchers. It’s like trying to measure a boy’s height when he’s still growing! As the extensive work of Saburo Sugiyama (our third metrologists under review) states regarding the history and measurement difficulties at Teotihuacán and its major objects, let alone its overall city dimensions:

“Many of the structures visible today at the city were built in highly symmetric relation [My comment: That’s reassuring.] to each other along the north-south axis (Avenue of the Dead) at the latest by approximately 250 AD, though initial construction stages with significantly different spatial distributions may have begun at least one century earlier (Million 1973 Million et. al. 1973 Sugiyama 2003). In spite of the large corpus of information from the city’s apogee [Note: At one point the population exceeded 200,000 by 600 AD – although the author of this link, along with many other misinformed, calculate Teotihuacán to be 8 sq. miles or more, our claim, based on the ancient duodecimal system pegs it at 7,920’ (north/south axis) by 2,640’ wide or 1.5 miles * .5 miles = .75 square miles or 20,908,800 sq. feet/43,560 sq. ft. (1 acre) = 480 acres…a square mile is 5,280’ * 5,280’ = 27,878,400’/43,560 sq. ft. = 640 acres…480/640 = 0.75% – the architects of the city, according to Harleston, having commenced around 600 BC], we are critically lacking data from its initial stages, which would allow us to better examine issues related to its genesis and early transformation processes.

“According to our current ceramic chronology and C14 data, among the few known early constructions were the city’s three major monuments: the Sun Pyramid, the Moon Pyramid, and a large ceremonial complex, called the Citadel, with its main structure the Feathered Serpent Pyramid (FSP). …However, the city’s basic spatial arrangement evidently endured until its collapse around AD 600 (Millon 1988 Cowgill 1996 Sugiyama 2003).

“Extensive explorations of these three monuments began in the early 20th century when precise and systematic recording methods had not yet been established (e.g., Batrese 1906 Gamio 1922 Salazar 1970).

“Therefore, the original excavation data from these projects are scarce, fragmentary, or often inaccurate. However, two large projects to re-explore the PSP in 1988-89 and the Moon Pyramid in 1998-2004 are providing new architectural and chronological information (Cabrera, Sugiyama, and Cowgill 1991 Sugiyama 2004 2005 Sugiyama and Cabrera 2003 Sugiyama and Lopez 2006, 2007).

“The Sun Pyramid was also excavated recently by an INAH project that completely uncovered its facades and basal platform (Matos 1995).” (THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF MEASUREMENT – COMPREHENDING HEAVEN, EARTH AND THE TIME IN ANCIENT SOCIETIES – Cambridge University Press – 2010 – by Lain Morley, Colin Renfre, under the section known as the preliminary results of the “Measurement Unity Study”)

So you see – this is not so easy – see here at World Mysteries extensive coverage at Teotihuacán. A casual aerial view of, for example, the plaza in front of the Pyramid of the Moon (above), clearly shows surrounding altars impacted with dirt which covers most of their backsides…work is still very much on-going insofar as restoration/excavation concerns.

The drawing made in 1984 by the Harleston team measured the Citadel in what appears to be around 378 STU (see back side) to a sort of “open ended” either “336” to an “eye evaluation ledger” (cir. 1984) on the side equally somewhere between “0 and 380” with 380 appearing as if it were intended to be the other side measurement – but this has left us somewhat “open-ended” in our ability to accurately measure with the naked eye. Again, the 378 x 378 (or his perimeter of 1,512 STU) would be 1,313.832933’ x 1,313.832933’ – however, if we were to calculate 380 STU x 380 STU we would have 380 * 3.4757485’ = 1,320.78443’ x 1,320.78443’ and, quite frankly, this measurement is easily envisioned as 1,320’ x 1,320’.

Harleston, however, is fairly set on his calendrical, astronomical, or cosmological systems. Again, from 1964 into 1972 and 1974, the Harleston team did an extensive style of metrological drawings and came up with this. [Please “enlarge” your view to maximum to see his calculations.] However, the far right/facing Citadel he initially measured as 377H (i.e., STU) x 378H (Hunabs) or 377H * 3.4757485’ = 1,310.35718’ x 1,313.832933 (adding 1 more Hunab of 3.4757485’) to his 377 STU would have given him a 378H x 378H measurement and, consequently, a quadrilateral square – not a quadrilateral rectangle – which 378H x 378H he eventually acquiesced to as a logical conclusion: A square object!

On the other hand, precisely measuring the Citadel at 1,320’ x 1,320’ would necessitate the following measurements converted to STU (aka “hunabs”) as:

Again: 1,320’/3.4757485’ (1 STU/Hunab) = 379.774313361295 STU/Hunabs * 4 (if a perfect square Citadel base) equals a base Citadel perimeter of 1,519.097253440518 STU (or 1,519.10 rounding up) not Harleston’s 1,512 STU (if the Citadel is a square) or 5,280’ base perimeter (1,320’ * 4 = 5,280’) vs. 5,255.331732’ base perimeter or a differential of 24.668268’ or 7.1 STU/Hunab. We are scarcely talking about a differential on all of the sides of the square around six feet or a difference of 24.668268’/3.4757485’ (1 STU) = 7.09725344 STU.

If we examine the Harleston measurements over a period from 1964 to 2008 – some 44 years – their consistency has been amazing and approximating the 1,320’ x 1,320’ square of the Citadel – which we believe to be the intention of the builders – not an ambiguous quadrilateral (any four-sided object) as Harleston in earlier rendering/measurements left open for speculation (but has since maintained the Citadel as a quadrilateral square).

The foursquare quadrilateral matches the New Jerusalem (“The city is laid out as a square its length is as great as its breadth…its length, breadth, and height [for it is a cube] are equal” Rev. 21:16.) and other measurements at Teotihuacán. The 1,320’ x 1,320’ x 1,320’ x 1,320’ (base perimeter = 5,280’) measurements are, as well, so close to that of the “Sumerian Foot Team” (4,700 s.f. = base perimeter = 5,170’ – their team GPS from a north/south measurement is 1,320’) and the Harleston measurements (1,152 STU = 5,255.331732’ perimeter) as to be inconsequential as to their differences. Notwithstanding, there have been many other attempts at the Citadel’s measurements, including those done by Saburo Sugiyama in 1993 with additional research up through and including 2008.


Teotihuacan: The Place where Men Become Gods

Among the hundreds of archaeological sites in Mexico, Teotihuacan is the most visited, even more than the New Wonder of the World, Chichen Itza, or the mysterious city of Monte Albán, in Oaxaca. Teotihuacan is for Mexicans a pre-Hispanic Mecca. Teotihuacan is now a Unesco World Heritage Site.

Visiting Teotihuacan is a pilgrimage many families make, that creates some of the most treasured memories of our childhood, and having climbed the hundreds of steps of the Pyramid of the Moon is an experience that we like to boast about.

To ancient Mexicans, Teotihuacan was a holy city. Located a 40 miles northeast of Mexico City, it was the birthplace of the fifth sun. “The world had been destroyed four times. To bring forth the rise of a new sun the gods gathered at Teotihuacan.

They performed sacrifices and life returned to earth: the fifth sun was born.

Many assume that the Aztecs or Mexicas built Teotihuacan, but it was not. In fact, historians do not yet know who constructed it, but they do confirm that it dates centuries before our era, and that in its period of splendor it was inhabited by 150 to 200 thousand people and that it extended more than 20 square kilometers of built territory.

Teotihuacan became the most important city of ancient Mexico from 300 B.C. to 900 A.D., approximately. During this period, the Teotihuacan Empire exerted its influence upon many regions in Mesoamerica.

Its architecture displayed monumental characteristics.

Given its mystical essence, thousands of people visit Teotihuacan and ascend the Pyramid of the Sun and Moon during the spring equinox every March 21. Do not visit Teotihuacan if your intention is to learn about this archaeological marvel in depth.