The story

Frederick Evans

Frederick Evans


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Frederick Mullet Evans was born in 1803. As a young man he met Benjamin Disraeli, who worked with his elder brother Thomas Mullett Evans, as a solicitor's clerk with the City firm of Swaine and Stevens. After leaving school he moved to Southampton and became involved in the printing trade.

In 1830 Evans he joined with William Bradbury (1800–1869) in London establish the printing firm of Bradbury and Evans, located in Bouverie Street. His biographer, Robert L. Patten has pointed out: "After opening a printing works dominated by a large steam-driven rotary press of the latest design, and advertising the firm as one capable of handling the demanding task of printing newspapers and other periodicals, Bradbury and Evans soon had such major clients as the Chambers brothers in Edinburgh, for whom they printed Chambers's Edinburgh Journal and Chambers's Cyclopedia, as well as Richard Bentley, Alexander Maxwell, Edward Moxon, and Edward Chapman and William Hall. In the 1850s they became the main printers for Smith, Elder, and obtained additional work from Macmillan."

Bradbury and Evans also printed several weekly newspapers and periodicals such as the Illustrated London News. The company was also the printers of the books published by Chapman and Hall. It has been argued that the company was the first printers in Britain to adopt the French process of stereotyping. During this period the company employed over 200 compositors.

In December 1842 Bradbury and Evans were persuaded to become the printers and the proprietors of the struggling new magazine Punch. The journalist Mark Lemon became the editor and within a few years began selling over 40,000 copies a week and bringing in some £10,000 a year to the company. Punch's success created a ready market for other books by its writers and artists, and Bradbury and Evans subsequently published volumes written or illustrated by people such as Douglas Jerrold, William Makepeace Thackeray, Shirley Brooks, John Leech, Richard Doyle, Henry Mayhew and Charles Keene. The author Harriet Martineau described Evans as "one of the best men in the world; and a capital man of business too, and full of knowledge".

In 1844 Charles Dickens decided to end his relationship with Chapman and Hall. The author of Dickens: A Life (2011) has pointed out: "If Dickens is to be believed, each publisher started well and then turned into a villain; but the truth is that, while they were businessmen and drove hard bargains, Dickens was often demonstrably in the wrong in his dealings with them. He realized that selling copyrights had been a mistake: he was understandably aggrieved to think that all his hard work was making them rich while he was sweating and struggling, and he began to think of publishers as men who made profits from his work and failed to reward him as they should. Chapman & Hall kept on good terms with him largely by topping up what they had initially agreed with frequent extra payments."

The author of Charles Dickens and his Publishers (1978) has argued: "In 1844, dissatisfied with Chapman and Hall, Dickens proposed to his printers that they become his publishers as well. Despite the firm's initial reluctance, on 1st June Dickens entered into agreements that constituted Bradbury and Evans for the ensuing eight years his publishers as well as printers, with a quarter share in all future copyrights, in exchange for a large cash advance."

Charles Dickens was a supporter of the Liberal Party and in 1845 he began to consider the idea of publishing a daily newspaper that could compete with The Times. He contacted Joseph Paxton, who had recently become very wealthy as a result of his railway investments. Paxton agreed to invest £25,000 and Dickens' publishers, Bradbury and Evans, contributed £22,500. Dickens agreed to become editor on a salary of £2,000 a year.

The first edition of The Daily News, published on 21st January 1846. Dickens wrote: "The principles advocated in the Daily News will be principles of progress and improvement; of education, civil and religious liberty, and equal legislation." Dickens employed his great friend and fellow social reformer, Douglas Jerrold, as the newspaper's sub-editor. William Henry Wills joined the newspaper as assistant editor. Dickens put his father, John Dickens, in charge of the reporters. He also paid his father-in-law, George Hogarth, five guineas a week to write on music.

The Times had a circulation of 25,000 copies and sold for sevenpence, whereas The Daily News, provided eight pages for fivepence. At first it sold 10,000 copies but soon fell to less than 4,000. Dickens told his friends that he missed writing novels and after seventeen issues he handed it over to his close friend, John Forster. The new editor had more experience of journalism and under his leadership sales increased. However, Bradbury and Evans lost a large sum of money on its investment.

Robert L. Patten has argued that Evans was much more successful with his publication of Dickens's novels: "By contrast, the publishing of Dickens's books, on terms highly favourable to the author, was substantially and steadily profitable for all concerned. Evans bore principal responsibility for drafting terms renewing the firm's publishing agreement with Dickens in 1852. As they had done with Thackeray, they voluntarily renounced their 10 per cent commission as a charge against expenses before the profits were divided, and the novelist happily accepted. Over a period of fourteen years Bradbury and Evans published for Dickens some of the most memorable novels in the language: four of the Christmas books, Dombey and Son, David Copperfield, Bleak House and Little Dorrit."

In February 1850, Dickens decided to join forces with his publisher, Bradbury & Evans, and his friend, John Forster, to publish the journal, Household Words. Dickens became editor and William Henry Wills, a journalist he worked with on the Daily News, became his assistant. One colleague described Wills as "a very intelligent and industrious man... but rather too gentle and compliant always to enforce his own intentions effectually upon others." Dickens thought that Wills was the ideal man for the job. He commented to Edward Bulwer-Lytton: "Wills has no genius, and is, in literary matters, sufficiently commonplace to represent a very large proportion of our readers". However, he went on to praise his "boundless energy".

Dickens rented an office at 16 Wellington Street North, a small and narrow thoroughfare just off the Strand. Dickens described it as "exceedingly pretty with the bowed front, the bow reaching up for two stories, each giving a flood of light." Dickens announced that aim of the journal would be the "raising up of those that are down, and the general improvement of our social condition". He argued that it was necessary to reform a society where "infancy was made stunted, ugly, and full of pain; maturity made old, and old age imbecile; and pauperism made hopeless every day." He added that he wanted London to "set an example of humanity and justice to the whole Empire".

After lengthy negotiations it was agreed that Dickens would have half share in all profits of Household Words, whereas Bradbury & Evans to have one quarter, John Forster and William Henry Wills, one eighth each. Whereas the publisher was to manage all the commercial details, Dickens was to be in sole charge of editorial policy and content. Dickens was also paid £40 a month for his services as editor and a fee was agreed for any articles and stories published by the journal. The first edition of the journal appeared on 30th March, 1850. It contained 24 pages and cost twopence and came out every Wednesday. On the top of each page were the words: "Conducted by Charles Dickens". All contributions were anonymous but when his friend, Douglas Jerrold, read it for the first time, he commented that it was "mononymous throughout".

Dickens planned to serialise his new novels in Household Words. Another project was the serialisation of A Child's History of England. He also wanted to promote the work of like-minded writers. The first person he contacted was Elizabeth Gaskell. Dickens had been very impressed with her first novel, Mary Barton: A Tale of Manchester Life (1848) and offered to take her future work. The magazine proved highly popular, its circulation rivaling that of Punch.

Peter Ackroyd has argued: "It was nothing like such serious journals as The Edinburgh Review - it was not in any sense intellectual - but rather took its place among the magazines which heralded or exploited the growth of the reading public throughout this period... Since this was not the cleverest, the most scholarly or even the most imaginative audience in Britain, Household Words had to be cheerful, bright, informative and, above all, readable."

Frederick Evans was a close friends of Charles Dickens and they took holidays together. In May 1858, Catherine Dickens accidentally received a bracelet meant for Ellen Ternan. Her daughter, Kate Dickens, says her mother was distraught by the incident. Charles Dickens responded by a meeting with his solicitors. By the end of the month he negotiated a settlement where Catherine should have £400 a year and a carriage and the children would live with Dickens. Later, the children insisted they had been forced to live with their father.

In June, 1858, Dickens decided to issue a statement to the press about the rumours involving him and two unnamed women (Ellen Ternan and Georgina Hogarth): "By some means, arising out of wickedness, or out of folly, or out of inconceivable wild chance, or out of all three, this trouble has been the occasion of misrepresentations, mostly grossly false, most monstrous, and most cruel - involving, not only me, but innocent persons dear to my heart... I most solemnly declare, then - and this I do both in my own name and in my wife's name - that all the lately whispered rumours touching the trouble, at which I have glanced, are abominably false. And whosoever repeats one of them after this denial, will lie as wilfully and as foully as it is possible for any false witness to lie, before heaven and earth."

Dickens also made reference to his problems with Catherine Dickens: "Some domestic trouble of mine, of long-standing, on which I will make no further remark than that it claims to be respected, as being of a sacredly private nature, has lately been brought to an arrangement, which involves no anger or ill-will of any kind, and the whole origin, progress, and surrounding circumstances of which have been, throughout, within the knowledge of my children. It is amicably composed, and its details have now to be forgotten by those concerned in it."

The statement was published in The Times and Household Words. However, Punch Magazine, edited by his great friend, Mark Lemon, refused, bringing an end to their long friendship. Frederick Evans supported Lemon in this dispute. William Makepeace Thackeray also took the side of Catherine and he was also banned from the house. Dickens was so upset that he insisted that his daughters, Mamie Dickens and Kate Dickens, brought an end to their friendship with the children of Lemon and Thackeray.

Dickens felt betrayed by Evans and he decided he would not publish his next novel, A Tale of Two Cities, in Household Words. Jealous of the money that Bradbury & Evans had made out of the venture, he decided to start a new journal, All the Year Round. He had 300,000 handbills and posters printed, in order to advertise the new journal. When Bradbury & Evans heard the news they issued an injunction claiming that Dickens was still contracted to work for their journal. Dickens refused to back-down and the first edition of the journal was published on 30th April 1859. For the first time in his life he had sole control of a journal. "He owned it, he edited it, and only he could take the major decisions concerning it." This was reinforced by the masthead that said: "A weekly journal conducted by Charles Dickens." Dickens took William Henry Wills with him as partner at the increased rate of £420 a year and a quarter share.

Evans responded by publishing a new journal. Robert L. Patten has argued: "Bradbury and Evans soon began publication of a rival periodical, Once a Week, that drew upon the firm's long experience with woodblock printing, and its relationships with prominent artists, to present lavishly illustrated serialized novels. Evans had initially extracted a half-promise from Thackeray to contribute, which would have given the magazine a big name to offset its Dickensian rival, but the terms of Thackeray's subsequent agreement with George Smith to write two novels for the Cornhill Magazine forbade him to write for any other journal. Despite this early misstep the magazine soon set the highest standard of illustration of any periodical of its time, and attracted contributions from a wide variety of writers and artists... The magazine's circulation, however, never matched its critical esteem, and three successive editors failed to slow its decline. Expensive to produce and lacking a consistently attractive series of novels, Once a Week became a financial burden on the firm over the following decade."

Dickens vowed never to speak to Evans again, and attempted to sever all contact between the two families. He told Catherine Dickens: "I absolutely prohibit... any of the children... ever being taken to Mr. Evans's house". This created problems for his eldest son, Charles Culliford Dickens, who was engaged to Evans's daughter, Bessie (1839–1907). Dickens commented in March 1861: "Charley.... will probably marry the daughter of Mr. Evans, the very last person on earth whom I could desire so to honor me." He blamed Catherine for his son's "odious" choice. "I wish I could hope that Cliarley's marriage may not be a disastrous one. There is no help for it, and the dear fellow does what is unavoidable - his foolish mother would have effectually committed him if nothing else had; chiefly I suppose because her hatred of the bride and all belonging to her, used to know no bounds, and was quite inappeasable. But I have a strong belief, founded on careful observation of him, that he cares nothing for the girl".

Claire Tomalin, the author of Dickens: A Life (2011) has pointed out: "He (Charles Dickens) tried to stop friends from attending the wedding, or entering the Evans house; and he blamed Catherine, who was of course at the wedding, and was indeed fond of the bride." The couple were married at St. Mark's Church in Regent's Park, on 19th November 1861. Dickens wrote to Robert Bulwer-Lytton complaining: ""The name the young lady has changed for mine, is odious to me and when I have said that. I have said all that need be said". Bessie gave birth to Mary Angela Dickens in autumn 1862.

In 1865 Evans and his partner, William Bradbury, relinquished control of the company to their sons and to William and Thomas Agnew, prominent Manchester art dealers who at the same time were taken into partnership to supply the firm with much needed capital. Evans's decision to go into business with his son and Charles Culliford Dickens, in a papermaking company led to the loss of his savings and an appearance before the bankruptcy court in December 1868.

Frederick Evans died on 25th June 1870 at the house of his son Fred, 18 Albert Road, St Pancras, London.

On 1st June, after many preliminary discussions with Forster and with William Bradbury and Frederick Evans, an agreement was signed whereby they paid £2,000 into his account and he assigned to them a quarter share in everything he would write over the next eight years, without being formally committed to write anything, although it was expected that there would be another Christmas book for 1844.

Charley rejected his father's authority on this and related subjects, but Dickens downplayed his defiance by blaming his "odious" choice on Catherine. "I wish I could hope that Cliarley's marriage may not be a disastrous one,"" he wrote Mrs. Brown two weeks before the wedding. "There is no help for it, and the dear fellow does what is unavoidable - his foolish mother would have effectually committed him if nothing else had; chiefly I suppose because her hatred of the bride and all belonging to her, used to know no bounds, and was quite inappeasable. But I have a strong belief, founded on careful observation of him, that he cares nothing for the girl".

A domestic event that greatly displeased him during these years was Charley's marriage, in the autumn of 1861, to Bessie, daughter of Frederick Evans, now implacably seen by Dickens as an enemy. The young couple had been childhood sweethearts but Dickens chose to see their marriage (he did not attend the wedding) as something his unfortunate first-born could not help and largely the fault of Catherine.


How the Perfect Lawn Became a Symbol of the American Dream

With the rise of suburbia in post-WWII America, the perfect lawn became a potent symbol of the American dream. Whether a sprawling sweep of green mowed in crisp diagonal bands or a more modest swatch of grass and clover, a lawn expressed the national ideal that, with hard work, sacrifice and perhaps a little help from Uncle Sam, home ownership and a patch of land could be within reach for every American.

By contrast, Europe’s historical development of lawns had largely expressed values of elitism and power: Some medieval castle dwellers needed their tall grass hand-cut by scythes in order to see approaching enemies. Landowners with livestock required fields cut down to grazeable heights. And wealthy people with leisure time tamed nature into neatly trimmed surfaces for sporting endeavors like golf, tennis and lawn bowling.

And while early American landowners had appropriated some of those values, by the mid 20th century, the nation had grown its own, less elitist image of the lawn. That evolving history would be shaped by the G.I. Bill, widespread home ownership, egalitarian ideals, technological advancements in mowing, golf courses and the saga of race.

Man mowing his well kept lawn.

Anne Cusack/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images


From Enslavement to Business Ownership

Postell Patterson, son of F. D. Patterson, on the running board of a Greenfield-Patterson Roadster as introduced in 1915. The Patterson showroom is in the background.

Courtesy of the Historical Society of Greenfield

While it’s unclear how C.R. Patterson obtained his freedom, he made his way to Greenfield, Ohio before the Civil War, and got work in the city’s carriage-building trade, where he earned a position as foreman. After the company he worked for was bought by another local carriage maker, he became a partner in that business. He eventually became the sole proprietor, reorganizing as C.R. Patterson & Sons.

At the height of its carriage business in the 1890s, C.R. Patterson & Sons employed a racially integrated team of 10 to 15 workers, who turned out 28 different styles of carriage vehicles, from simple, open buggies to more elaborate closed styles sold to doctors and other professionals throughout the South and the Midwest. Along the way, Patterson earned several patents for his innovations.

In a 1965 interview with the Pittsburgh Courier, Patterson’s daughter Katie Buster talked about the company her father had started nearly a century earlier. “We had built up a nice trade in the South for an especially built buggy for doctors,” she said. “The great majority of our employees were white, and we never experienced any labor trouble.”


Frederick Evans Papers

I am looking for anyone who knows what might have happened to the paper archives and/or photograph collections of Frederick Evans. I know that many images in his collection went to the Royal Photographic Society and are now in Bradford and some of the images ended up at the George Eastman House. But I know that he owned some images that I have been unable to track down. I was wondering if perhaps they were still with the family or if a particular dealer/collector/institution has a substantial collection that I am unaware of. I am interested primarily in his collection of prints by other artists and his correspondence with F. Holland Day. Any leads or contacts would be appreciated.

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I have met a photographic dealer in Santa Fe, I think named Smith, who has some prints and papers. There is a retired successful photographer named Ford now living in Woodbridge who has Evans's notes for lectures to Camera Clubs. Dr David Cameron ARPS of Alabama has a number of Evans prints which he displayed at the Historical Group's Conference on the History of Church Photography. There is a record in the PhotoHistorian. There is the ARPS Mr Jones, whose wife was Lucy Jones FRPS, who had numbers of Evans prints under his bed in Catford, These went to a nephew when he died.


Ancestors of Hannah Evans

1. Hannah Evans, born 1801 in Meadow Creek, Greene Co. Tennessee died 04 May 1883 in Tennessee. She was the daughter of 2. Jonathan Evans and 3. Hannah Cravens. She married (1) Charles Love 1 20 Oct 1818 in Greene Co, Tennessee. He was born 01 Oct 1783 in Greeneville, Greene, Tennessee, USA 1 , and died 19 Jun 1841 in Greeneville, Greene, Tennessee. He was the son of Thomas Love and Dorothea Unknown.

2. Jonathan Evans, born 1760 in Augusta Co, Virginia (Now Rockingham) died 27 Apr 1813 in Greene Co, Tennessee. He was the son of 4. Evan Evans and 5. Unknown Shanklin. He married 3. Hannah Cravens Jun 1779 in Rockingham, Virginia 2 .

3. Hannah Cravens, born 1762 in Augusta, Virginia or Cooks Creek Tennessee died 01 Nov 1841 in Augusta County, West Virginia. She was the daughter of 6. John Cravens and 7. Margaret Hiatt.

Children of Jonathan Evans and Hannah Cravens are:

i. Evan Evans, born 1773 in Greene Co, Tennessee died 01 Mar 1841 in Green Co. Tennessee married Margaret Shields 24 Dec 1804 in Greene, Tennessee died Bef. 1830 in Green Co. Tennessee.

ii. William Evans, born Abt. 1780 in Green Co. Tennessee died in Harrisonburg, Rockingham County, Virginia married Rebecca Harrison 25 Oct 1810 in Augusta Co, Virginia born Abt. 1790.

iii. John Evans, born 1780 in Augusta County, Virginia died Bef. 1850 in Green Co. Tennessee married Lucy Love 21 Mar 1799 in Greene Co, Tennessee born 1780 in Jefferson, Tennessee, USA 3 died 1847 in Dandridge, Jefferson Co, Tennessee.

iv. Jonathan A. Evans, born Abt. 1781 in Greene, Tennessee.

v. Robert William Evans 3 , born 1785 in Greene, Tennessee, USA 3 died 21 Feb 1841 in Greene Co. Tennessee married Mary Francis Love 13 Aug 1806 in Greene Co. Tennessee born 21 Aug 1769 in Fauquier or Prince William Co. VA died 21 Feb 1842 in Greene, Tennessee.

1 vi. Hannah Evans, born 1801 in Meadow Creek, Greene Co. Tennessee died 04 May 1883 in Tennessee married Charles Love 20 Oct 1818 in Greene Co, Tennessee.

vii. Margaret Ann Evans, born 1804 in Greene Co. Tennessee died 28 Jan 1864 in Near Camp Douglas Illinois married Robert H. Cochran 12 Sep 1828 in Green Co. Tennessee born 1798 in Tennessee died in Illinois.

viii. James C. Evans, born 1812 in Green Co. Tennessee died 1884 married Mary E. Unknown born Abt. 1812.

4. Evan Evans 3 , born 1729 in VA, USA 3 died 21 Oct 1821 3 . He was the son of 8. David Evans and 9. Rachel Burnet. He married 5. Unknown Shanklin.

5. Unknown Shanklin, born Abt. 1730.

Children of Evan Evans and Unknown Shanklin are:

i. Evan Evans, born 1750 in Augusta Co, Virginia died in Green Co. Tennessee.

ii. Elizabeth Evans 3 , born Abt. 1756 in Augusta Co, Virginia died in Green Co. Tennessee married Rev. James Magill born 1756 in Bridgewater, VA, USA 3 died 14 Aug 1840 in Madisonville, Tennessee 4 .

2 iii. Jonathan Evans, born 1760 in Augusta Co, Virginia (Now Rockingham) died 27 Apr 1813 in Greene Co, Tennessee married Hannah Cravens Jun 1779 in Rockingham, Virginia.

6. John Cravens, born 1722 in Sussex, Delaware died 24 Jul 1778 in Fisher Springs Virginia. He was the son of 12. sr Robert R. Cravens and 13. Mary Harrison. He married 7. Margaret Hiatt Abt. 1759 in Rockingham, Virginia.

7. Margaret Hiatt, born 1727 in Bucks Co, Pennsylvania died 1826 in Rockingham, Virginia. She was the daughter of 14. John Hiatt and 15. Rachel Wilbur.

Children of John Cravens and Margaret Hiatt are:

i. Mary Cravens, born 1760 in Virginia died Bef. 1810 married Josiah Harrison 1779 born 1760 5 died 1812 in Mecklenburg, NC, USA 5 .

3 ii. Hannah Cravens, born 1762 in Augusta, Virginia or Cooks Creek Tennessee died 01 Nov 1841 in Augusta County, West Virginia married Jonathan Evans Jun 1779 in Rockingham, Virginia.

iii. Robert Cravens, born 1764 in Virginia died 10 Dec 1793 in Virginia.

iv. Rev. William Cravens, born 20 Apr 1766 in Augusta, Virginia died 10 Oct 1826 in Madison, Indiana married Jean Harrison born Abt. 1779 died 1835 in Indiana.

v. Dr. Joseph Cravens, born 20 May 1769 in Augusta, Virginia died 1842 in Madison, Indiana married Mary Nickel 30 Nov 1790 in Crook's Creek, Rockingham, Virginia born 10 Apr 1774 in Virginia died 28 Nov 1847 in Madison, Indiana.

vi. James Cravens 6,7,8 , born 12 Apr 1773 in Augusta County, Virginia died 1821 in Selma Alabama married Ann Nancy Love 20 Dec 1797 in Greene Co. Tennessee born 1776 in Tennessee died 1821 in Selma, Alabama 9 .

vii. Margaret Cravens, born 26 Aug 1775 in Augusta, Virginia died 19 Mar 1850 in Slanesville, Hampshire, West Virginia married (1) Henry Smith 04 Apr 1792 born 1758 married (2) Joseph Snapp 04 Oct 1793 in Rockingham, Virginia born 17 Jun 1771 in Strasburg, Shenandoah, Virginia died 12 Dec 1847 in Slanesville, Hampshire, West Virginia.

8. David Evans 9 , born 1799 in Bush River, Newberry, SC, USA 9 died 19 Nov 1861 in Warren, OH, USA 9 . He married 9. Rachel Burnet.

9. Rachel Burnet 9 , born 1779 9 died 1804 9 .

Child of David Evans and Rachel Burnet is:

4 i. Evan Evans, born 1729 in VA, USA died 21 Oct 1821 married (1) Unknown Shanklin..

12. sr Robert R. Cravens, born 1696 in Kent Co Delaware died May 1762 in Augusta, later Rockingham, Virginia. He was the son of 24. Richard Cravens. He married 13. Mary Harrison 17 Aug 1721 in Maidenhead Plantation, Sussex on the Delaware.

13. Mary Harrison 9,10 , born 25 May 1696 in Oyster Bay, Long Island, New Jersey died 28 May 1781 in Augusta, later Rockingham, Virginia. She was the daughter of 26. Isaiah Harrison and 27. Elizabeth Wright.

Children of Robert Cravens and Mary Harrison are:

i. Joseph Cravens 10 , born 1723 in Sussex, DE, USA 10 died 1763 married (2) Naomi Harrison born Abt. 1723.

ii. Mary Cravens 10 , born 1726 in Lewes, Sussex, Delaware died 1801 in Rockingham, Virginia married Samuel Hemphill Bef. 1761 born Abt. 1723 died 1809 in Rockingham, Virginia.

iii. Agnes Cravens 10 , born 1732 in Prince William, VA, USA 10 married John McGill Bef. 1761 born Abt. 1732.

iv. Elizabeth Cravens 10 , born 1737 in Sussex, DE, USA 10 married Jacob Miller born Abt. 1737.

6 v. John Cravens, born 1722 in Sussex, Delaware died 24 Jul 1778 in Fisher Springs Virginia married Margaret Hiatt Abt. 1759 in Rockingham, Virginia.

vi. William Cravens 10 , born 1730 in Sussex, DE, USA 10 married Jane Harrison 1744 in Rockingham, Virginia born 1726.

vii. Margaret Cravens 10 , born 1724 in Lewes, Sussex, Delaware died 1753 married (1) Primrose married (2) Zebulon Harrison 23 Jul 1747 in Morristown, NJ born Abt. 1721 in Long Island, New York died 1792 in Lacey Springs, Augusta, later Rockingham, Virginia.

viii. Capt., Robert Cravens 10 , born 1733 in Sussex Co., Delaware 10 died Mar 1784 in Rockingham, Virginia married Hester Harrison born 1738 in Augusta, later Rockingham, Virginia died 27 Apr 1781 in Rockingham County, Virginia.

ix. William Cravens, born 1725 in Lewes, Sussex, Delaware married Jane Unknown 1744 born Abt. 1730.

14. John Hiatt, born 1696 in England died 26 Oct 1764 in Frederick Co, VA. He was the son of 28. John Hiatt and 29. Mary Smith. He married 15. Rachel Wilbur 1722 in Bucks, PA.

15. Rachel Wilbur, born 28 Feb 1697/98 in Kendal, W. England died Abt. 1746 in Frederick Co VA.

Children of John Hiatt and Rachel Wilbur are:

i. John Hiatt, born Abt. 1726.

7 ii. Margaret Hiatt, born 1727 in Bucks Co, Pennsylvania died 1826 in Rockingham, Virginia married (1) William Dyer married (2) John Cravens Abt. 1759 in Rockingham, Virginia married (3) Dennis Lanahan 20 Mar 1782 in Virginia.

24. Richard Cravens, born 1748. He was the son of 48. Joseph Cravens and 49. Rachel Unknown.

Children of Richard Cravens are:

12 i. sr Robert R. Cravens, born 1696 in Kent Co Delaware died May 1762 in Augusta, later Rockingham, Virginia married Mary Harrison 17 Aug 1721 in Maidenhead Plantation, Sussex on the Delaware.

ii. Margaret Cravens, born Abt. 1701 in England died in England married Daniel Harrison born 1701 in Smithfield, Suffolk, New York died 10 Jul 1770 in Augusta, later Rockingham, Virginia.

26. Isaiah Harrison, born 1666 in Chester, England died 1738 in Augusta, later Rockingham, Virginia. He was the son of 52. Thomas Harrison and 53. Katherine Bradshaw. He married 27. Elizabeth Wright 1688 in Oyster Bay, Long Island, New York.

27. Elizabeth Wright, born 1666. She was the daughter of 54. Gideon Wright and 55. Elizabeth Townsend.

Children of Isaiah Harrison and Elizabeth Wright are:

i. Isaiah Harrison, born 27 Sep 1689 in Oyster Bay, Long Island, New York died in South Carolina.

ii. John Harrison, born 25 Sep 1691 in Oyster Bay, Long Island, New York died May 1771 in Lacey Springs, Augusta, later Rockingham, Virginia married Phoebe Unknown 1720 born 1686 in Oyster Bay, Nassau, NY, USA 10 died 06 Dec 1793 in Lacey Springs, Augusta, later Rockingham, Virginia.

13 iii. Mary Harrison, born 25 May 1696 in Oyster Bay, Long Island, New Jersey died 28 May 1781 in Augusta, later Rockingham, Virginia married sr Robert R. Cravens 17 Aug 1721 in Maidenhead Plantation, Sussex on the Delaware.

28. John Hiatt, born 1674 in Worcestershire, England died 1726 in Bucks Co, Pennsylvania. He was the son of 56. John Hiatt and 57. Margret. He married 29. Mary Smith Abt. 1695 in England.

29. Mary Smith, born 1677 in England died 1745 in Bucks Co, Pennsylvania. She was the daughter of 58. William Smith and 59. Grace.

Child of John Hiatt and Mary Smith is:

14 i. John Hiatt, born 1696 in England died 26 Oct 1764 in Frederick Co, VA married Rachel Wilbur 1722 in Bucks, PA.

48. Joseph Cravens 10 , born 1677 in England, ON, Canada 10 died in Salem New Jersey. He was the son of 96. Sir Thomas Craven and 97. Margaret Craven. He married 49. Rachel Unknown Bef. 1676 in England.

49. Rachel Unknown, born 1676 10 .

Children of Joseph Cravens and Rachel Unknown are:

i. Joseph Cravens, born Abt. 1695.

24 ii. Richard Cravens, born 1748.

52. Thomas Harrison, born 1615 in Kingston-upon-Hull, England died 1682 in Dublin, Ireland. He was the son of 104. Richard Harrison. He married 53. Katherine Bradshaw 1659 in Jamestown.

53. Katherine Bradshaw, born 1637 in Chester, England died Aft. 1682. She was the daughter of 106. Edward Bradshaw and 107. Susannah Blease.

Children of Thomas Harrison and Katherine Bradshaw are:

i. Hannah Harrison, born Abt. 1660 married (1) Benjamin Harison born Abt. 1660 married (2) Benjamin Harrison II born Abt. 1660.

ii. Thomas Harrison 11 , born 23 Apr 1661 died 1662 in Chester, England 11

iii. Katherine Harrison 11 , born 15 Aug 1663 died 1664 in Chester, England 11

26 iv. Isaiah Harrison, born 1666 in Chester, England died 1738 in Augusta, later Rockingham, Virginia married (1) Elizabeth Wright 1688 in Oyster Bay, Long Island, New York married (2) Abigail Smith 1702 in Huntington, Long Island, New York.

54. Gideon Wright, born Abt. 1630 died 1685. He was the son of 108. Peter Wright and 109. Alice Unknown. He married 55. Elizabeth Townsend.

55. Elizabeth Townsend, born Bef. 1660. She was the daughter of 110. John Townsend and 111. Elizabeth Montgomerie.

Child of Gideon Wright and Elizabeth Townsend is:

27 i. Elizabeth Wright, born 1666 married Isaiah Harrison 1688 in Oyster Bay, Long Island, New York.

56. John Hiatt, born Abt. 1650 in Lancaster PA. He married 57. Margret.

57. Margret, born Abt. 1650.

Child of John Hiatt and Margret is:

28 i. John Hiatt, born 1674 in Worcestershire, England died 1726 in Bucks Co, Pennsylvania married Mary Smith Abt. 1695 in England.

58. William Smith He married 59. Grace.

Child of William Smith and Grace is:

29 i. Mary Smith, born 1677 in England died 1745 in Bucks Co, Pennsylvania married John Hiatt Abt. 1695 in England.

96. Sir Thomas Craven, born Abt. 1604 died in England. He was the son of 192. Sir Anthony Craven. He married 97. Margaret Craven.

97. Margaret Craven, born Abt. 1604. She was the daughter of 194. Robert Craven.

Children of Thomas Craven and Margaret Craven are:

48 i. Joseph Cravens, born 1677 in England, ON, Canada died in Salem New Jersey married Rachel Unknown Bef. 1676 in England.

104. Richard Harrison, born 1550. He was the son of 208. John Harrison.

Children of Richard Harrison are:

i. Edward Harrison, born Abt. 1612.

ii. Benjamin Harrison, born Abt. 1614.

52 iii. Thomas Harrison, born 1615 in Kingston-upon-Hull, England died 1682 in Dublin, Ireland married (1) Dorothy Symonds 1648 in Massachusetts married (2) Katherine Bradshaw 1659 in Jamestown.

106. Edward Bradshaw 11 , born 1604 died 21 Oct 1671. He married 107. Susannah Blease.

107. Susannah Blease, born Abt. 1604 in London England.

Children of Edward Bradshaw and Susannah Blease are:

i. Elizabeth Bradshaw, born Abt. 1632 married George Manwaring 1672 born in Chester, England.

ii. Mary Bradshaw, born Abt. 1633 married Roger Manwaring 1672 in Kermoncham, England born in Chester, England.

iii. James Bradshaw, born Abt. 1634 married Dorothy Ellerker born in Risby, England.

iv. Edward Bradshaw, born Abt. 1635.

v. Christopher Bradshaw, born Abt. 1636.

53 vi. Katherine Bradshaw, born 1637 in Chester, England died Aft. 1682 married (1) Thomas D Harrison married (2) Thomas Harrison 1659 in Jamestown.

Child of Edward Bradshaw and Sussanah Blease is:

108. Peter Wright, born 1600 died 1660. He married 109. Alice Unknown.

109. Alice Unknown, born Abt. 1600.

Child of Peter Wright and Alice Unknown is:54 i. Gideon Wright, born Abt. 1630 died 1685 married Elizabeth Townsend.

110. John Townsend, born Bef. 1640 in Norwick, Norfolk Co. England died 1668 in Oyster Bay, Long Island. He married 111. Elizabeth Montgomerie.

111. Elizabeth Montgomerie, born Bef. 1640.

Child of John Townsend and Elizabeth Montgomerie is:

55 i. Elizabeth Townsend, born Bef. 1660 married (1) Gideon Wright married (2) Gershom Lockwood Aug 1697.

192. Sir Anthony Craven, born Abt. 1541. He was the son of 384. Sir William Craven and 385. Beatrix Hunter.

Child of Sir Anthony Craven is:

96 i. Sir Thomas Craven, born Abt. 1604 died in England married Margaret Craven.

194. Robert Craven, born 1574 in England died Bet. 1659 - 1661 in England. He was the son of 388. Henry Craven and 389. Margaret Sherwood.

Children of Robert Craven and Mary Brockdon are:

i. Robert Craven, born Abt. 1605.

ii. John Craven, born Abt. 1606.

iii. Sir Anthony Craven, born 1607 in Spersholt, Berkshire, England died 1670 married Elizabeth Pelnets born in Mark, Germany.

iv. Henry Craven, born 1608 in England died 1634 in England.

v. Sir William Craven, born 1610 in England died 1665 in Lenchwicke, Worcester, England married Mary Fairfax born Abt. 1610.

vi. Sir Thomas Craven, born 1611 in England died 15 Apr 1682 in Burnsal, Craven, England married Ann Proctor born Abt. 1611 in Beckwith England.

Child of Robert Craven is:

97 i. Margaret Craven, born Abt. 1604 married Sir Thomas Craven.

208. John Harrison, born 1530. He was the son of 416. Thomas Harrison.

Children of John Harrison are:

104 i. Richard Harrison, born 1550.

ii. Rowland Harrison, born 1550.

384. Sir William Craven, born Abt. 1506. He was the son of 768. John Craven and 769. ? Simpson. He married 385. Beatrix Hunter 1539.

385. Beatrix Hunter, born Abt. 1520 died 1597. She was the daughter of 770. John Hunter.

Children of William Craven and Beatrix Hunter are:

192 i. Sir Anthony Craven, born Abt. 1541.

ii. Sir William Craven, born Abt. 1542 in England died in England married Elizabeth Whitmore born 1550 in England died Bet. 1616 - 1618 in England.

iii. Henry Craven, born 1543 in England died 1603 in England married Margaret Sherwood born Abt. 1543 in England.

388. Henry Craven, born 1543 in England died 1603 in England. He was the son of 384. Sir William Craven and 385. Beatrix Hunter. He married 389. Margaret Sherwood.

389. Margaret Sherwood, born Abt. 1543 in England.

Children of Henry Craven and Margaret Sherwood are:

i. William Craven, born 1571.

194 ii. Robert Craven, born 1574 in England died Bet. 1659 - 1661 in England married (1) Mary Brockdon..

iii. Thomas Craven, born 1578.

416. Thomas Harrison, born Abt. 1504 died Abt. 1595. He was the son of 832. John Harrison and 833. Margaret Unknown.

Child of Thomas Harrison is:

768. John Craven, born 1485 in England died 1507 in England. He married 769. ? Simpson.

769. ? Simpson, born Abt. 1485 in England.

Child of John Craven and ? Simpson is:

384 i. Sir William Craven, born Abt. 1506 married Beatrix Hunter 1539.

770. John Hunter

385 i. Beatrix Hunter, born Abt. 1520 died 1597 married Sir William Craven 1539.

832. John Harrison, born Abt. 1474 died 09 Jul 1505. He was the son of 1664. William Harrison. He married 833. Margaret Unknown.

833. Margaret Unknown, born Abt. 1474.

Children of John Harrison and Margaret Unknown are:

i. John Harrison, born Abt. 1502 died 30 Nov 1530 married Unknown born Abt. 1502.

ii. William Harrison, born Abt. 1503 died 1566 in Wickham, England married Agnes Hodshon born Abt. 1503.

416 iii. Thomas Harrison, born Abt. 1504 died Abt. 1595.

1664. William Harrison, born Abt. 1429 died 1475. He was the son of 3328. Thomas Harrison.

Child of William Harrison is:

832 i. John Harrison, born Abt. 1474 died 09 Jul 1505 married Margaret Unknown.

3328. Thomas Harrison, born Abt. 1390 died 10 Aug 1430. He was the son of 6656. Adam Harrison.

Child of Thomas Harrison is:

1664 i. William Harrison, born Abt. 1429 died 1475.

6656. Adam Harrison, born Abt. 1373 died 01 May 1391. He was the son of 13312. Henry de Hede.

Child of Adam Harrison is:

3328 i. Thomas Harrison, born Abt. 1390 died 10 Aug 1430.

13312. Henry de Hede, born Abt. 1350 died 31 Mar 1374.

Child of Henry de Hede is:

6656 i. Adam Harrison, born Abt. 1373 died 01 May 1391.


Fred Evans

Fred Evans' violent death during the 1912 Waihi miners' strike made this otherwise obscure figure into a martyr of the New Zealand labour movement. He remains one of only two people to be killed during an industrial dispute in this country's history.

Evans was born on 11 February 1881 in the Australian mining town of Ballarat, Victoria. He married in 1906 and three years later came to New Zealand with his wife and two small children. By 1912 he was working as a stationary-engine driver at the Waihi goldmine.

Evans belonged to the Waihi Trade Union of Workers (WTUW), then led by future Labour Cabinet minister Bill Parry, who was also Australian-born. This union was affiliated to the militant New Zealand Federation of Labour (FOL, or 'Red Feds') and was bitterly opposed to the Waihi Goldmining Company. In April, encouraged by the company, a group of engine drivers formed their own union, and in June it was registered under the industrial arbitration system. The miners demanded these men be dismissed. When the company refused, the WTUW went on strike on 13 May. Refusing to join the breakaway union, Evans acted as provision storekeeper for the strikers, and was an occasional correspondent for the FOL newspaper, the Maoriland Worker.

In September the government sent extra police with horses, batons and firearms to Waihi. Almost 70 of the leading strikers were arrested, including Evans he was found guilty then discharged. The strikers' position worsened after the mine was reopened with ‘scab' labour on 2 October. Violence escalated in early November. On Friday the 8th Evans was caught up in a street fight. His wife May – who, like many of the strikers' wives, took a prominent role in the dispute – came to his defence, shaming a policeman into walking away rather than hitting her.

After further clashes on the Monday, strikers agreed with police to reduce their pickets at the miners' hall. Early on Tuesday 12 November, Evans arrived at the hall to relieve one of the three or four men still on duty. Soon after, a crowd of strike-breakers, backed by police, stormed the hall. During a struggle at the door, strikebreaker Thomas Johnston was shot in the knee, possibly by Evans. As the unionists fled out the back of the hall, Constable Gerald Wade was shot in the stomach, but managed to strike Evans down with his baton. The striker collapsed under a barrage of boots and blows.

Evans was left for an hour and a half in police cells before being taken to hospital. He never regained consciousness and died the following day. Johnston's and Wade's injuries were slight. At the inquiry into Evans' death, Constable Wade was found to have been ‘fully justified in striking deceased down’.

The FOL organised a huge political funeral in Auckland, where thousands of mourners lined the streets unionists later raised £1100 to assist May Evans and her children. Fred Evans was buried at Waikaraka cemetery on 17 November.


HISTORY OF THE FARM

In 1857 a young man, Frederick Vonderahe, hired on as a freight wagon driver bound for the West. After several weeks, and in the middle of the prairie, a disagreement prompted Frederick to choose to walk instead. He actually arrived in Oregon ahead of the wagon train.

Frederick ultimately settled on property south of Oregon City, near the settlement of Carns, later known as Carus. The rolling hills, tall timber and abundance of water were perfect for the fruit and grain farming that Frederick intended. The property is now the home of Evans Farms, owned and operated by his great, great granddaughter, Cindy Lou Pease. Cindy Lou assumed leadership in 1980. Sons Jeremy and Joshua have joined the family business as well.

Nursery crops were begun in 1964 by Cindy Lou’s parents, Eldon and Joyce Evans. Prior to 1964, fruits and vegetables were commercially grown on the farm and also were offered for sale to the public. When ornamental plants were available for sale, the Garden Center was born.

The nursery is a highly productive wholesale field and container growing business growing over 300 varieties of plant material on over 250 acres. Evans Farms currently ships plant material to 36 states.

We welcome customer visits to tour the growing grounds and arboretum. We prefer to schedule in advance but if unable to, please stop by and we will do our utmost to accommodate.


Frederick Evans - History

Sayles & Evans traces its origins to the 1875 partnership of John A. Reynolds and Frederick Collin, soon joined by John B. Stanchfield in the firm of Reynolds, Stanchfield & Collin. Through the years, the firm's name has changed to Stanchfield, Lovell, Falck & Sayles then Sayles, Collin, Flannery & Evans and from 1958 through 2000, Sayles, Evans, Brayton, Palmer & Tifft. Its founding partners were active in the legal and political affairs of the state, with Frederick Collin having served on the New York Court of Appeals from 1910 to 1920 and John B. Stanchfield having been the Democratic candidate for governor in 1900. Stanchfield later became a partner of the New York City firm of Chadbourne, Stanchfield & Levy where he was recognized as one of the foremost trial lawyers in America.

Alexander Falck served with the firm from 1901 to 1918, when he left to become an officer of Corning Glass Works. He served as president of that company from 1920 to 1928 and chairman of the board from 1929 to 1941. Halsey Sayles was active in the firm from 1905 until his death in 1958. Perhaps the last of the general practitioners, he handled both litigation and corporate work and served as a director of Corning Glass Works, American LaFrance, Chemung Canal Trust Company, Arnot Ogden Memorial Hospital, and the Delaware Lackawana & Western Railroad Company. More recent partners such as Charles L. Brayton, William E. Palmer, Bela Tifft, Kenneth Tifft, and Edward B. Hoffman were instrumental in the affairs of Hardinge Incorporated, The Hilliard Corporation, Watkins Salt Company, Schweizer Aircraft Corporation, and Arnot Ogden Medical Center.

Over the 130-plus years of its existence, the firm has been deeply involved in the cultural and charitable affairs of the community, with its partners providing legal advice and leadership to such diverse organizations as the Arnot Art Museum, the Clemens Center, Arnot Ogden Medical Center, Tanglewood Nature Center, Steele Memorial Library, Elmira College, the Chemung County Historical Society, Southern Tier Economic Growth, and the Community Foundation of the Elmira Corning Area.


Evans History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The surname Evans was first found in Herefordshire.

"Exceedingly numerous in North and South Wales and in the adjacent English counties of Shropshire and Monmouth. Thence it has spread, but in rapidly diminishing numbers to the midland counties and to the south - west of England. It is absent or singularly rare in the northern counties, a line from the Humber to the Mersey sharply defining its northward extension. Not one of the coast counties, from Norfolk round to the borders of Devon, is represented in my list." [3]

Coat of Arms and Surname History Package

$24.95 $21.20

Early History of the Evans family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Evans research. Another 126 words (9 lines of text) covering the years 1050, 1632, 1080, 1607, 1660, 1645, 1679, 1630, 1702, 1720, 1693, 1734, 1723, 1715, 1680, 1749 and are included under the topic Early Evans History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Unisex Coat of Arms Hooded Sweatshirt

Evans Spelling Variations

There are relatively few surnames native to Wales, but they have an inordinately large number of spelling variations. Early variations of Welsh surnames can be explained by the fact that very few people in the early Middle Ages were literate. Priests and the few other literate people were responsible for recording names in official documents. And because most people could not specific how to properly record their names it was up to the individual recorder of that time to determine how a spoken name should be recorded. Variations due to the imprecise or improper recording of a name continued later in history when names originally composed in the Brythonic Celtic, language of Wales, known by natives as Cymraeg, were transliterated into English. Welsh names that were documented in English often changed dramatically since the native language of Wales, which was highly inflected, did not copy well. Occasionally, however, spelling variations were carried out according to an individual's specific design: a branch loyalty within the family, a religious adherence, or even patriotic affiliations could be indicated by minor variations. The spelling variations of the name Evans have included Evans, Evan, Evance, Evands, Evanson, Evason, Evens, Evenson and many more.

Early Notables of the Evans family (pre 1700)

Prominent amongst the family during the late Middle Ages was Rhirid Flaith a descendant in the Evans line about 1080 Arise Evans (or Rhys or Rice Evans) (1607-1660), a Welsh prophet and fanatic Saint Philip Evans (1645-1679), Welsh priest, declared guilty of treason and executed, one of The Forty Martyrs of England and Wales George Evans, D.D. (1630?-1702).
Another 57 words (4 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Evans Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Evans family to Ireland

Some of the Evans family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 110 words (8 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Evans migration +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Evans Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Christo Evans, who arrived in Virginia in 1622 [4]
  • Laurance Evans, who landed in Virginia in 1622 [4]
  • Lawrence Evans, who arrived in Virginia in 1623 [4]
  • Marke Evans, who arrived in Virginia in 1623 [4]
  • Clement Evans, who landed in Virginia in 1623 [4]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Evans Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Jonathan Evans, who landed in Virginia in 1707 [4]
  • Jos Evans, who landed in Virginia in 1711 [4]
  • Lydia Evans, who landed in Pennsylvania in 1711 [4]
  • Philip Evans, who arrived in Virginia in 1714 [4]
  • Griffeth Evans, who arrived in Virginia in 1714 [4]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Evans Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • John May Evans, who arrived in America in 1801-1802 [4]
  • John D Evans, who arrived in Pennsylvania in 1802 [4]
  • John J Evans, who landed in Pennsylvania in 1802 [4]
  • Ferdinand G Evans, who arrived in Pennsylvania in 1806 [4]
  • Hugh W Evans, who arrived in Maryland in 1811 [4]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Evans migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Evans Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century
  • Griffith Evans, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1749
  • John Jwoihfne Evans, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1749
  • Joseph Evans, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1749-1752
  • William Evans, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1749
  • Joseph Evans, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1750
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Evans Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century
  • John Evans, who arrived in Canada in 1823
  • Moses Evans, who landed in Canada in 1830
  • Charlotte Evans, who landed in Canada in 1832
  • Alicia Evans, aged 28, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick aboard the ship "Sea Horse" in 1833
  • Henry Evans, aged 16, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick aboard the ship "Sea Horse" in 1833
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Evans Settlers in Canada in the 20th Century
  • M Evans, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick in 1907
  • D Evans, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick in 1907

Evans migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Evans Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • David Evans, English convict from Sussex, who was transported aboard the "Ann" on August 1809, settling in New South Wales, Australia[5]
  • Joseph Evans, English convict from Somerset, who was transported aboard the "Ann" on August 1809, settling in New South Wales, Australia[5]
  • Lewis Evans, British convict from Malta, who was transported aboard the "Ann" on August 1809, settling in New South Wales, Australia[5]
  • William Evans, English convict from Kent, who was transported aboard the "Ann" on August 1809, settling in New South Wales, Australia[5]
  • Miss Jane Evans, English convict who was convicted in Kent, England for life, transported aboard the "Canada" in March 1810, arriving in New South Wales, Australia[6]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Evans migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:


Frederick Evans - History

PCA HISTORICAL CENTER
Archives and Manuscript Repository for the Continuing Presbyterian Church

Frederick W. Evans, Jr.
Manuscript Collection MS#045
Box #550

Content Summary: Writings Class notes and papers from Princeton Theological Seminary [1944-1947] and Christian Theological Seminary [1972-1977] Correspondence Notes on the Merriam Case [PCUSA, 1961-1962]

Span dates: 1942 - 1992 Size: 1.0 cu. ft. (one carton)

Access: This collection is open to researchers.

Preferred citation:
Frederick W. Evans Jr. Manuscript Collection, Box 550, PCA Historical Center, St. Louis, Missouri.

Related Collections:
Princeton Theological Seminary Miscellany Collection.


The Rev. Dr. Frederick W. Evans, Jr.

1924-1992

Box 550
File—Subject [folders have been sorted alphabetically to facilitate reference]
ƒ 01 — Finding Aid
ƒ 02 — DeHaven, John, 1947, A Comparison of the Scottish Confession of Faith of 1560 and the Westminster Confession of Faith [30pp.] Submitted in competition for the Senior Prize in Church History, Princeton Theological Seminary
ƒ 41 — Evans, Frederick W., Jr., 1968 – 1985, Writings: Dilemma in the Study of Literature [Christian Teacher, Jan – Mar, 1968, pp. 5 – 10] From Above or From Beneath? [Bible Evangelism, 9.3 (June 1968) pp. 2 – 5] If the Foundations be Destroyed…? [Bible Evangelism, 13.5 (September 1972) 1 – 3] An Explanation of “A Statement of Missionary Concern” [1985, 9pp.]
ƒ 03 — Evans, Frederick W., Jr., 1944 – 1945, Princeton Theological Seminary, Introduction to Ecumenics (McKay): Syllabus, Bibliography, Course Notes
ƒ 04 — Evans, Frederick W., Jr., 1945, Princeton Theological Seminary, Church and State (Hromadka), Course Notes
ƒ 05 — Evans, Frederick W., Jr., 1945, Princeton Theological Seminary, English Bible (Kuist): Course Notes, Exam
ƒ 06 — Evans, Frederick W., Jr., 1945, Princeton Theological Seminary, Theology of Crisis (Hromadka): Course Notes
ƒ 07 — Evans, Frederick W., Jr., 1946, Princeton Seminary Coursework: Middler’s Worksheets in Old Testament [62pp.]
ƒ 08 — Evans, Frederick W., Jr., 1946, Princeton Theological Seminary, Christian Ethics (Hromadka), Course Notes
ƒ 09 — Evans, Frederick W., Jr., 1946, Princeton Theological Seminary, Church History (Loetscher): Syllabus, Bibliography, Class Notes, Final Exam
ƒ 04 — Evans, Frederick W., Jr., 1946, Princeton Theological Seminary, Church History II (Loetscher): Syllabus, Bibliography, Class Notes, Final Exam
ƒ 11 — Evans, Frederick W., Jr., 1946, Princeton Theological Seminary, Calvin’s Institutes (Kuizenga): Syllabus, Exam, Four Papers on Book 1, Chapter 4 and Book 3, Chapter 8 – 10
ƒ 12 — Evans, Frederick W., Jr., 1946, Princeton Theological Seminary, Doctrine of Christ (Hromadka): Course Notes, Final Exam
ྵ 3 — Evans, Frederick W., Jr., 1946, Princeton Theological Seminary, Psychology of Christian Experience (Kuizenga): Course Notes, A Post-Mortem Appraisal of Buchmanism [19pp.]
ƒ 14 — Evans, Frederick W., Jr., 1946, Princeton Theological Seminary, Prison Epistles (Kuist): Course Notes, Christian Principles of Behaviour in Colossians [11pp.]
ƒ 15 — Evans, Frederick W., Jr., 1946, Princeton Theological Seminary: A Comparison of the Shorter Catechism with the Heidelberg Catechism, [27pp.] Submitted in competition for the Middler Prizes on the Samuel Robinson Foundation
ƒ 16 — Evans, Frederick W., Jr., 1947, Princeton Theological Seminary, Jeremiah (Kuist): Syllabus, Course Notes, Papers
ƒ 17 — Evans, Frederick W., Jr., 1947, Princeton Theological Seminary, Modern Church Documents: Summary and Review of The Great Christian Doctrine of Original Sin by Jonathan Edwards, [10pp.] The Doctrine of Sin in Anselm, [3pp.]
ྵ 8 — Evans, Frederick W., Jr., 1947, Princeton Theological Seminary, Studies in John (Kuist): Course Notes and Papers Prayer Card for the Stan Smurthwaites [North Africa Mission]
ƒ 24 — Evans, Frederick W., Jr., 1972, Christian Theological Seminary, Expansion of Christianity in the West: Syllabus, Course Notes, The Byzantine Mission to Central Europe in the Ninth Century [15pp.]
ƒ 25 — Evans, Frederick W., Jr., 1972, Christian Theological Seminary, History of Preaching (Osborn): Syllabus, Course Notes, Contemporaries in Contrast: A Brief Comparison of the Backgrounds, Theologies and Preaching of Harry Emerson Fosdick and Clarence Edward Macartney [15pp.]
ƒ 26 — Evans, Frederick W., Jr., 1972, Christian Theological Seminary, Problems in Early Church History: Syllabus and Course Notes, Marcion of Pontus: 2 nd Century Heretic or 20 th Century Hero? [16pp.]
ƒ 27 — Evans, Frederick W., Jr., 1972, Christian Theological Seminary, Reformation Christianity (McAllister): Syllabus, Course Notes, The Life and Work of John Knox [15pp.]
ƒ 28 — Evans, Frederick W., Jr., 1973, Christian Theological Seminary, Modern European Christianity (McAllister): Syllabus, Course Notes, The Evangelical Alliance: Its Story and Its Message for Today [15pp.]
ƒ 29 — Evans, Frederick W., Jr., 1973, Christian Theological Seminary, Renaissance Christianity (Ashanin): Syllabus, Bibliography, The Conciliar Consciousness Up to the Council of Pisa [17pp.]
ƒ 30 — Evans, Frederick W., Jr., 1974, Christian Theological Seminary, Seminar on Jonathan Edwards (Watkins): Course Notes, Jonathan Edwards: Revival Preacher – A Brief Analysis of Sermons Preached in 1734 – 1735 [18pp.]
ƒ 31 — Evans, Frederick W., Jr., 1975, Christian Theological Seminary, Ancient Christian Literature: Course Notes, Exam, Eusebius of Caesarea: The Man, His Major Work, His Method [20pp.]
ƒ 32 — Evans, Frederick W., Jr., 1975, Christian Theological Seminary, Medieval Theology: Course Notes, Exams, The Moral and Spiritual Neglect of the Masses During the Time of the Middle Ages [22pp.]
ƒ 33 — Evans, Frederick W., Jr., 1976, Christian Theological Seminary, History of Liberalism (Towne): Types of Modern Theology: Adolf Harnack and His Orthodox Respondents [20pp.], Syllabus, Course Notes, Related Articles, including Learned Men Who Have Made Havoc in Christendom by Dr. J. Oliver Buswell, Jr. [reference outline, 2pp.]
ƒ 34 — Evans, Frederick W., Jr., 1976, Christian Theological Seminary, Patristic Christianity: Syllabus, Course Notes, Ursacius and Valens: Bishops and Knaves – A Study in Arianism, [19pp.]
ƒ 35 — Evans, Frederick W., Jr., 1977, Christian Theological Seminary, Ancient Christian Literature, Course Notes, Exam, Clement of Alexandria and the Rise of Christian Civilization [19pp.]
ƒ 36 — Evans, Frederick W., Jr., 1977, Christian Theological Seminary, Classic Christian Literature: Notes, Exam, The Theology of ‘The Paradiso: A Beginner’s Study in Dante [18pp.]
ƒ 37 — Evans, Frederick W., Jr., 1977, Christian Theological Seminary, Emergent Issues in the Ecumenical Movement: The Conservative Response to the World Council of Churches [25pp] The Nature of the Unity We Have: An Exegesis and Exposition of 1 Corinthians 12:13 [7pp.] Course Notes A Fellowship of Local Churches Truly United [WCC publication, February 1977, 10pp]
ƒ 38 — Evans, Frederick W., Jr., 1990, Writings: The Master’s Men [Bible Study employing Trusting God, by Jerry Bridges, 14pp. of outline and questions]
ƒ 39 — Evans, Frederick W., Jr., circa 1981, Writings: Preacher! Use This Resource!: The Possibilities of Church History in Preaching [11pp. typescript and 8pp. as printed in Presbyterion: Covenant Seminary Review]
ƒ 40 — Evans, Frederick W., Jr., circa 1981, Writings: Ten Missions Issues [D. Min. paper, Westminster Theological Seminary, 40pp.] Project Proposal on Value of Church History in the Local Congregation [3pp.]
ƒ 19 — Evans, Frederick W., Jr., undated, Princeton Theological Seminary, Method in the Use of the Bible: Syllabus, Course Notes
ƒ 20 — Evans, Frederick W., Jr., undated, Princeton Theological Seminary, Reformed Theology (Kuizenga), Course Notes [100 leaves]
ƒ 21 — Evans, Frederick W., Jr., undated, Princeton Theological Seminary, Isaiah: Course Notes
ƒ 22 — Evans, Frederick W., Jr., undated, Princeton Theological Seminary, Contemporary Catholicism (Rizzo): Course Notes [32 leaves]
ƒ 23 — Evans, Frederick W., Jr., undated, Princeton Theological Seminary, New Testament History (Metzger), Course Outline and Notes
ƒ 42 — Evans, Frederick W., Jr., undated, Writings: A Study of Alexander Whyte [Title page missing, 43pp.]
ƒ 33 — Evans, Frederick W., Jr., undated, Writings: Communicating Church History to Our People! [6pp.] Revival and Awakening in Colonial America Nineteenth Century Revivalism and Its Impact on Contemporary Evangelism [8pp.] The New Measures Controversy of 1826 – 1827: Watershed in American Evangelism [7pp.] The Teaching of Charles R. Solomon and Grace Fellowship International: A Brief Evaluation [5pp.] Toward Spiritual Discernment [5pp.]
ƒ 44 — Evans, Frederick W., Jr., undated, Writings: Neo-Evangelicalism and Its Impact on Missions: An Historical Overview [15pp.]
ƒ 45 — Fellowship of Independent Evangelical Churches, 1966, 1972 – 1974, Constitution, By-Laws, Directories, Minutes
ƒ 46 — Independent Presbyterian Church, Greensboro, NC, 1955 – 1966, History, Correspondence, Bulletins, Membership Class Lessions 1 – 4
ƒ 47 — Lee, Rev. Sang Kun, 1955 – 1965, 1992, Correspondence [58 leaves], Photos
ƒ 48 — Merriam, Stuart H. and Broadway Presbyterian Church, 1961 – 1962, Miscellaneous Materials Pertaining to New York Presbytery’s (PCUSA) Dismissal of Rev. Merriam [90pp.]
ƒ 49 — Princeton Theological Seminary, 1960 – 1962, Miscellaneous Articles about Princeton
ƒ 50 — Study/Critique on Fundamentalism, circa 1980’s, 3pp.


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Watch the video: Frederick H. Evans: A Look at the Exhibition (June 2022).