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Anna Harrison

Anna Harrison


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Anna Harrison (1775-1864) was an American first lady (1841), the wife of William Henry Harrison, ninth president of the United States, and grandmother of Benjamin Harrison, the 23rd president. She was the first First Lady to receive a formal education, counting Martha Washington’s granddaughter among her classmates. As her husband’s military and political career advanced, Anna oversaw their household and large, growing family. Anna was too ill to attend her husband’s March 1841 inauguration, and by the time she had recovered, William himself had fallen ill and soon passed away, ending Anna’s one month tenure as First Lady. After William’s death, Anna spent her remaining years with her sole surviving son, helping him raise her grandson, Benjamin, who would become president in 1869.

Anna Tuthill Symmes was just 1 when her mother died, and her father, John Cleve Symmes, was too busy as a Continental Army officer and then associate justice on the New Jersey Superior Court to properly care for her. When Anna was 4, Judge Symmes dressed up as a British solider and brought his daughter on horseback through British-occupied New York to the Long Island home of her maternal grandparents, Henry and Phoebe Tuthill. Anna later returned to live with her father as an adolescent.

Following her wedding to army captain William Henry Harrison in 1795, Anna moved several times to accommodate her husband’s various government positions. His appointment as territorial governor of Indiana in the early 1800s brought them to the former French trading post of Vincennes, where they built an elegant mansion named Grouseland. The Harrisons hosted such notable political figures as Vice President Aaron Burr at that home, but the combination of Harrison’s responsibilities and Grouseland’s locale also produced more eclectic guests, such as powerful Shawnee Indian chief Tecumseh and his brother Tenskwatawa.

Following a lengthy career of government service, Harrison returned to a quiet life at the family farm in North Bend, Ohio, in the 1830s. As such, Anna was opposed to his selection as a Whig Party candidate for U.S. president in 1836 and 1840. The 1836 candidacy fizzled, but the subsequent one caught momentum behind the famous “Tippecanoe and Tyler too” campaign. Despite her reservations, Anna played a gracious host for visiting supporters. After Harrison’s landslide victory, she grumbled, “I wish that my husband’s friends had left him where he is, happy and contented in retirement.”

Her husband’s death was just one of many personal losses she endured. She also dealt with the deaths of son William Henry Jr. (1838), son Carter Bassett (1839), son Benjamin (1840), daughter Mary Symmes (1842), daughter Anna Tuthill (1845) and daughter Elizabeth Bassett (1846). Altogether, she outlived nine of her 10 children.

The passing of President Harrison before Anna was able to join him in Washington, D.C. gave her the dubious distinction of being the only incumbent first lady to not set foot in the White House. Afterward, she was the first presidential widow to be awarded a pension by Congress, which consisted of a $25,000 lump sum. With the election of Benjamin Harrison to the White House in 1889, she became the first woman to be both wife of a president and grandmother of another one.


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Anna Harrison - HISTORY

Anna Tuthill Symmes Harrison

Anna Harrison was too ill to travel when her husband set out from Ohio in 1841 for his inauguration. It was a long trip and a difficult one even by steamboat and railroad, with February weather uncertain at best, and she at age 65 was well acquainted with the rigors of frontier journeys.

As a girl of 19, bringing pretty clothes and dainty manners, she went out to Ohio with her father, Judge John Cleves Symmes, who had taken up land for settlement on the "north bend" of the Ohio River. She had grown up a young lady of the East, completing her education at a boarding school in New York City.

A clandestine marriage on November 25, 1795, united Anna Symmes and Lt. William Henry Harrison, an experienced soldier at 22. Though the young man came from one of the best families of Virginia, Judge Symmes did not want his daughter to face the hard life of frontier forts but eventualy, seeing her happiness, he accepted her choice.

Though Harrison won fame as an Indian fighter and hero of the War of 1812, he spent much of his life in a civilian career. His service in Congress as territorial delegate from Ohio gave Anna and their two children a chance to visit his family at Berkeley, their plantation on the James River. Her third child was born on that trip, at Richmond in September 1800. Harrison's appointment as governor of Indiana Territory took them even farther into the wilderness he built a handsome house at Vincennes that blended fortress and plantation mansion. Five more children were born to Anna.

Facing war in 1812, the family went to the farm at North Bend. Before peace was assured, she had borne two more children. There, at news of her husband's landslide electoral victory in 1840, home-loving Anna said simply: "I wish that my husband's friends had left him where he is, happy and contented in retirement."

When she decided not to go to Washington with him, the President-elect asked his daughter-in-law Jane Irwin Harrison, widow of his namesake son, to accompany him and act as hostess until Anna's proposed arrival in May. Half a dozen other relatives happily went with them. On April 4, exactly one month after his inauguration, he died, so Anna never made the journey. She had already begun her packing when she learned of her loss.

Accepting grief with admirable dignity, she stayed at her home in North Bend until the house burned in 1858 she lived nearby with her last surviving child, John Scott Harrison, until she died in February 1864 at the age of 88.


Anna Harrison (netball)

Anna Maree Harrison (née Scarlett born 15 April 1983 in Westport, New Zealand) [1] is a New Zealand netball and beach volleyball player. She stands at 1.87 m (6 ft 2 in). In netball Harrison plays as goal-keep, goal-defence and/or wing-defence.

Representing New Zealand
World Netball Championships
2003 Kingston Netball
2011 Singapore Netball
Commonwealth Games
2006 Melbourne Netball
2010 Delhi Netball
World Netball Series
2012 Auckland Fast5
2011 Liverpool Fastnet

Anna Maree used to play netball and basketball in winter and played beach and indoor volleyball during summer when she was in a boarding high school. [2] She was raised in Karamea on the South Island's west coast and in 2002 joined the New Zealand national netball team, the Silver Ferns, travelling to the Commonwealth Games with the team as a training player. [1] She went on to earn 39 caps in the Silver Ferns by the end of 2006. [3] but was not selected for the 2007 World Netball Championships squad, subsequently retiring from netball to focus on beach volleyball, [3] partnering with Susan Blundell. [4]

After several years on the international beach volleyball circuit, Harrison left the sport in 2010 and announced her intention to return to netball. [5] She signed with the Northern Mystics for the 2011 season of the ANZ Championship, [5] and also regained her place in the Silver Ferns lineup for 2010. [6] She made the team for the 2010 Commonwealth Games, where she was used in the Wing Defence position throughout the pool games. She was not named in the starting line-up for the final, but was injected into the game at half time, in the unfamiliar WD position, [7] and helped to turn around the deficit and win the gold medal. [8]

During the 2012 ANZ Championship season, Anna was married to sports scientist Craig Harrison. [9] She made the Silver Ferns again in 2012, and was used mainly in WD, to cover the loss of Joline Henry. [10]

In the 2012 ANZ Championships, Harrison was lifted up by her teammate in order to successfully block a shot above the rim, during the round 8 match against the Melbourne Vixens. It was pulled off two more times in the game. The controversial move was dubbed the 'Harrison Hoist' by the media, and attracted a massive response from fans and casual netball followers, many believing the move should be banned. She has performed this move several times since, including on the international scene. [11]

In February 2013, Harrison announced that she was three months pregnant and did not take part in the 2013 ANZ Championship. [12]

On 1 September 2013, Anna gave birth to her and Craig's first child, a son, Isaac and in 2015 gave birth to a daughter, Georgia. [13]

Harrison announced her retirement in 2018, and was the pioneer of the Harrison Hoist, similar to the line-out maneuvre in rugby union, the move is used to hoist her up above the rim to block shots, as there are no goaltending rules in netball, as it would in basketball, and block shots are not a statistical category in netball. [14]


Anna Harrison

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Anna Harrison, née Anna Tuthill Symmes, (born July 25, 1775, Morristown, New Jersey, U.S.—died February 25, 1864, North Bend, Ohio), American first lady (March 4–April 4, 1841), the wife of William Henry Harrison, ninth president of the United States, and grandmother of Benjamin Harrison, the 23rd president.

The daughter of John Cleves Symmes (a soldier in the American Revolution and a judge) and Anna Tuthill Symmes (who died when her daughter was one year old), Anna was raised by her maternal grandparents. She attended prestigious girls’ schools on the East Coast, including Clinton Academy in Easthampton, New York, and took classes from the famed educator and philanthropist Isabella Marshall Graham. The family, including her new stepmother, moved to Ohio in 1795 to settle on land purchased by Anna’s father after the Revolution. While visiting her sister in Kentucky, she met William Henry Harrison, then a young soldier. Although William came from a prominent Virginia family, Anna’s father objected to the match, citing the young man’s lack of any profession “but that of arms.” The couple married secretly on November 25, 1795, while her father was away.

While her husband’s career progressed from garrison commander to congressional delegate from the territory of Ohio, Anna gave birth to 10 children (including one who died at age three) between 1796 and 1814, and she took primary responsibility for their education and upbringing. Despite her privileged childhood, she adapted well to the frontier life she led while her husband served as governor of the Indiana Territory (1800–12).

When William won the presidency in 1840, the couple asked their daughter-in-law, Jane Irwin Harrison, widow of their son William Henry, to perform the duties of first lady until Anna, who was then ill, could come to Washington. As Anna began packing in April 1841, she learned of William’s death. Although he had served only one month in office, Congress voted to give Anna a pension equivalent to his salary, thus setting a precedent for the pensions of subsequent first ladies.

In 1858 Anna’s house was destroyed in a fire, and she spent the remaining six years of her life with her son John Scott Harrison, the only one of her children to outlive her. She was buried beside her husband in North Bend, Ohio.


Anna Tuthill Symmes Harrison

Anna Tuthill Symmes Harrison, wife of President William Henry Harrison and grandmother of President Benjamin Harrison, was First Lady during her husband’s one-month term in 1841, holding the title for the shortest length of time. She was the first First Lady to be widowed while holding the title.

Anna Harrison was too ill to travel when her husband set out from Ohio in 1841 for his inauguration. It was a long trip and a difficult one even by steamboat and railroad, with February weather uncertain at best, and she at age 65 was well acquainted with the rigors of frontier journeys.

As a girl of 19, bringing pretty clothes and dainty manners, she went out to Ohio with her father, Judge John Cleves Symmes, who had taken up land for settlement on the “north bend” of the Ohio River. She had grown up a young lady of the East, completing her education at a boarding school in New York City.

A clandestine marriage on November 25, 1795, united Anna Symmes and Lt. William Henry Harrison, an experienced soldier at 22. Though the young man came from one of the best families of Virginia, Judge Symmes did not want his daughter to face the hard life of frontier forts but eventually, seeing her happiness, he accepted her choice.

Though Harrison won fame as an Indian fighter and hero of the War of 1812, he spent much of his life in a civilian career. His service in Congress as territorial delegate from Ohio gave Anna and their two children a chance to visit his family at Berkeley, their plantation on the James River. Her third child was born on that trip, at Richmond in September 1800. Harrison’s appointment as governor of Indiana Territory took them even farther into the wilderness he built a handsome house at Vincennes that blended fortress and plantation mansion. Five more children were born to Anna.

Facing war in 1812, the family went to the farm at North Bend. Before peace was assured, she had borne two more children. There, at news of her husband’s landslide electoral victory in 1840, home-loving Anna said simply: “I wish that my husband’s friends had left him where he is, happy and contented in retirement.”

When she decided not to go to Washington with him, the President-elect asked his daughter-in-law Jane Irwin Harrison, widow of his namesake son, to accompany him and act as hostess until Anna’s proposed arrival in May. Half a dozen other relatives happily went with them. On April 4, exactly one month after his inauguration, he died, so Anna never made the journey. She had already begun her packing when she learned of her loss.

Accepting grief with admirable dignity, she stayed at her home in North Bend until the house burned in 1858 she lived nearby with her last surviving child, John Scott Harrison, until she died in February 1864 at the age of 88.

The biographies of the First Ladies on WhiteHouse.gov are from “The First Ladies of the United States of America,” by Allida Black. Copyright 2009 by the White House Historical Association.

Learn more about Anna Tuthill Symmes Harrison’s spouse, William Henry Harrison.


A Skilled Educator

Mount Holyoke College Archives and Special Collections

In addition to her research Harrison was known as a skilled classroom teacher. She made complicated things clear, and just as important, she was funny. She was also interested in how science affects the world at large and wanted to ensure that voters and policy makers had the scientific knowledge necessary for making wise decisions. She served on many advisory bodies, including the National Science Board, which advises the president and Congress on science policy. She even traveled to Antarctica to observe scientific activities on the frozen continent. She also became very active in the ACS, first chairing its Division of Chemical Education and eventually, in 1978, becoming its first woman president.

The information contained in this biography was last updated on December 7, 2017.

Oral History Collections

Explore the oral history collection at the Science History Institute, with interviews dating back to 1979.


Cynthiana, Kentucky

Cynthiana was named after Cynthia and Anna Harrison, [6] daughters of Robert Harrison, who had donated land for its establishment, [7] though Harrison County was named after Colonel Benjamin Harrison, who was an early settler in the area and the sheriff of Bourbon County. [8]

Two Civil War battles were fought in Cynthiana the first on July 17, 1862, was part of a raid into Kentucky by Confederate General John Hunt Morgan the second on June 11 and 12, 1864, resulted in defeat of Confederate forces on Morgan's last raid into the state. [9] [10]

On January 23, 1877, an LL chondrite meteorite fell in Cynthiana. [11]

March 2, 1997, the South Fork of the Licking River which bisects Cynthiana flooded, causing extensive damage in Cynthiana and neighboring communities.

In March, 2020, Cynthiana had the first case of COVID-19 in Kentucky. [12]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 4.1 square miles (10.5 km 2 ), of which 4.0 square miles (10.4 km 2 ) are land and 0.04 square miles (0.1 km 2 ), or 1.09%, are water. [4] The South Fork of the Licking River, a tributary of the Ohio River, flows south to north through the city, passing west of the downtown area.

Climate Edit

The climate in this area is characterized by hot, humid summers and generally mild to cool winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Cynthiana has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps. [14]

U.S. Highways Edit

    US 27 is known otherwise as Paris Pike (going south from Cynthiana), and Falmouth Road (going north from Cynthiana). US 62 is known otherwise as Leesburg Rd (going west from Cynthiana), and Oddville Pike (going east from Cynthiana).

Kentucky state highways Edit

    KY 36 is also known locally as Williamstown Road (west of Cynthiana) and Millersburg Pike (east of Cynthiana). KY 32 is also known locally as Connersville Pike (southwest of Cynthiana) and Millersburg Pike (east of Cynthiana). KY 32 and KY 36 merge downtown and leave Cynthiana concurrently. KY 356 is also known as White Oak Road.

Cynthiana is served by the Harrison County School District with a total of seven public schools located within the county limits:

  • High schools:
    • Harrison County High School
    • KY Tech Harrison Area Technology Center (ATC)
    • Harrison County Middle School
    • Eastside Elementary
    • Westside Elementary
    • Northside Elementary
    • Southside Elementary

    Cynthiana has one private school:

    Maysville Community and Technical College]has an extended campus located in Cynthiana

    Cynthiana has a public library, the Cynthiana-Harrison Public Library. [15]

    Historical population
    Census Pop.
    180078
    1810369 373.1%
    1830975
    1840798 −18.2%
    18601,237
    18701,771 43.2%
    18802,101 18.6%
    18903,016 43.6%
    19003,257 8.0%
    19103,603 10.6%
    19203,857 7.0%
    19304,386 13.7%
    19404,840 10.4%
    19504,847 0.1%
    19605,641 16.4%
    19706,356 12.7%
    19805,881 −7.5%
    19906,497 10.5%
    20006,258 −3.7%
    20106,402 2.3%
    2019 (est.)6,337 [2] −1.0%
    U.S. Decennial Census [16]

    As of the census [17] of 2000, there were 6,258 people, 2,692 households, and 1,639 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,873.6 people per square mile (723.4/km 2 ). There were 2,909 housing units at an average density of 870.9 per square mile (336.3/km 2 ). The racial makeup of the city was 92.43% White, 5.29% Black or African American, 0.16% Native American, 0.18% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 0.81% from other races, and 1.09% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.41% of the population.

    There were 2,692 households, out of which 27.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 42.2% were married couples living together, 14.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 39.1% were non-families. 36.0% of all households were made up of individuals, and 18.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.24 and the average family size was 2.89.

    In the city, the population was spread out, with 22.7% under the age of 18, 9.0% from 18 to 24, 26.3% from 25 to 44, 21.9% from 45 to 64, and 20.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females, there were 80.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 77.3 males.

    The median income for a household in the city was $28,519, and the median income for a family was $34,691. Males had a median income of $27,704 versus $20,659 for females. The per capita income for the city was $15,227. About 13.3% of families and 16.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 23.1% of those under age 18 and 11.7% of those age 65 or over.

    3M established a factory in Cynthiana in 1969. Post-it notes were developed in 1972 by Arthur Fry and Spencer Silver. Until patents expired in the late 1990s, the 3M factory in Cynthiana was the only production site of Post-it notes worldwide. Today, it still accounts for nearly all of the world's production. [18]


    Indiana’s First First Lady


    Anna Symmes Harrison had not yet made it to Washington when her husband gave his inaugural address. As she prepared to leave, she received news of his death.

    In November 1795, at the age of 20, and in the face of her father’s disapproval, Anna Symmes married a young army officer from Virginia.

    John Cleve Symmes was a Continental Army veteran and delegate to the Continental Congress, and former chief justice of the New Jersey Supreme Court, who had become the judge of the Northwest Territory in 1787. With a grant of one million acres of land on the new frontier, Symmes was a powerful and wealthy man.

    His daughter Anna had been educated in New York and then joined her father in Ohio in 1794, where she met Captain William Henry Harrison, who had been fighting against the Native Americans who opposed white settlement.

    Although he’d intended a better match for his daughter, Anna fell in love with the Virginian, who had been fighting against the Native Americans who opposed white settlement.

    For the first years of marriage, Anna Harrison lived in a small log home in North Bend, Ohio, and raised three children. For a few years, her husband continued his military career and then resigned his commission to pursue a career of public service. In 1801, William Henry Harrison became the first governor of the Indiana Territory he and his family moved to the town of Vincennes and built an imposing brick mansion (at least by territory standards) they named Grouseland.

    For more than a decade, Anna Harrison lived on the Indiana frontier, caring for and educating her growing flock of children, and acting as hostess to anyone of importance who ventured into the Indiana wilderness to visit the territorial capital.Anna was a religious woman, and her remaining letters show her devotion to her faith and to her family. In the years she lived at Grouseland, Anna was busy giving birth to and raising children—by 1812, when she left Indiana, the family included eight boys and girls.

    The War of 1812 brought turmoil to Vincennes, and Gov. Harrison sent his family back to Ohio. Anna gave birth to three more children, the last of whom died in infancy. Throughout the remainder of her husband’s career, which took him to the U.S. Congress, to Columbia as the nation’s minister to that country, and finally to the White House, Anna remained at home in Ohio (in a house that had grown from a small log building to a 22-room dwelling). Anna had not yet joined her husband in Washington, D.C., when he gave his inaugural address as President of the United States, and as she prepared to leave, she received the news of his death.

    Anna Symmes Harrison would outlive her husband and ten of her eleven children. She died at the age of 88 in Ohio, in her home of her surviving son, John Scott Harrison— whose son, Benjamin Harrison would become the 23rd President of the United States.

    A Moment of Indiana History is a production of WFIU Public Radio in partnership with the Indiana Public Broadcasting Stations. Research support comes from Indiana Magazine of History published by the Indiana University Department of History.

    Sources: Andrew Cayton, Frontier Indiana National First Ladies Library at http://www.firstladies.org


    Watch the video: Domastic - Violence ft. Anna Harrison (June 2022).