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Weber DE-675 - History

Weber DE-675 - History


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Weber

(DE-675: dp. 1,400; 1. 306'0"; b. 36'10"; dr. 9'5'' (mean), s. 24 k., cpl. 186, a. 3 3", 4 1.1", 8 20mm., 8 dcp., 1 dcp. (hh.), 2 dct.; cl. Buckley)

Weber (DE-675) was laid down on 22 February at Quincy, Mass., by the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Co.; launched on 1 May 1943, sponsored by Mrs. Matt A. Walsh; and commissioned on 30 June 1943, Comdr. Rollo N. Norgaard in command.

The destroyer escort completed fitting out and then departed Provincetown, Mass., on 23 July for Bermuda. At the conclusion of shakedown training in waters surrounding those islands, she returned north and arrived in Boston, Mass., on 21 August. Following post-shakedown availability, the new warship left Boston for several days of additional training—in antisubmarine warfare tactics—out of New London, Conn. Upon completing that assignment, Weber entered New York harbor to prepare for her first combat duty.

On 5 September, the warship stood out of New York in the screen of a transatlantic convoy. Following a relatively uneventful voyage, she and her charges entered port at Londonderry, Northern Ireland, on the 16th. There, she remained until the 21st, when she headed back across the Atlantic with a return convoy. She ended that voyage at St. John's, Newfoundland, on 1 October but soon thereafter, moved to New York for a 10-day availability at the navy yard at Brooklyn.

In mid-October, Weber escorted a convoy from New York to the Dutch island of Curacao, off the coast of Venezuela. She arrived in Willemstad on 24 October and remained there five days awaiting the formation of a transatlantic convoy. This group of Allied ships departed Curacao on 29 October and set a course for the British Isles and arrived in Londonderry on Armistice Day 1943.

At that point, Weber settled into a routine of escorting convoys between Londonderry and New York which lasted until August of 1944. By that time, she had made six more round-trip voyages between those ports. On many occasions during the period, she and her consorts in the screen made sonar and radar contacts on unidentified ships. While on such occasions they frequently attacked the strangers with depth charges, Weber and her sister escorts directed their greatest efforts to diverting their transports and cargo ships from the paths of U boats. When doing so, they informed nearby hunter/killer groups of the location of the contacts and delegated to them primary responsibility for offensive antisubmarine warfare. As a result, confirmed U-boat kills eluded Weber, but she and the other escorts in the screens accomplished their primary mission of shepherding the convoys safely across the ocean.

On 7 August, she departed Londonderry for the last time. Her convoy arrived safely in New York on the 20th and, after voyage repairs, the warship began preparations to embark upon a new but brief phase in her wartime career. After the Allied forces which invaded Europe in June established control over the coast of France, convoys no longer needed to travel the long northern route around Ireland to avoid enemy aircraft and submarines based on that coast. Instead, they now could use the shorter and more economical route around the southern coast of England directly to the French channel ports primary among which was Cherbourg. In September, Weber made one round-trip voyage to Cherbourg; then returned to the United States via that route and arrived back at New York near the end of the month.

After a 10-day availability and four days of exercises, the ship proceeded to Norfolk to join a convoy bound for North Africa and the Mediterranean Sea. She departed Norfolk with the convoy on 21 October. En route to Gibraltar, she rescued the crew of a Portuguese fishing vessel damaged badly in a collision with Weber during an investigation of the then-unidentified vessel. Soon after the rescue, the Portuguese vessel sank. After landing the fishermen at Gibraltar, Weber continued on to Bizerta, Tunisia where she stopped on 12 November and thence proceeded to Palermo, Sicily, for repairs to damage sustained in the collision with the Portuguese trawler. She rejoined her escort group at Oran, Algeria and embarked upon the return voyage on 23 November. Weber escorted one section of the attached convoy into Philadelphia on 10 December.

Five days after her arrival in Philadelphia, Weber was redesignated a high speed transport and received a new hull number, APD-75. Conversion work on her began immediately. During the following three months she exchanged her 3 inch battery for a new 5-inch, dualpurpose gun which had proven highly effective both for antiaircraft defense and for bombardment work. In addition, her relatively weak antiaircraft battery was beefed up substantially. Her spaces were mod)fied to provide a place for underwater demolition teams (UDT) and their equipment. Her conversion indicated an impending reassignment to the Pacific theater where the UDT men played an important role in the initial stages of amphibious operations. She completed her conversion in mid-March 1945.

During the latter part of the month, she moved to Norfolk where she practiced shore bombardments and antiaircraft defense. On 14 April, she departed Norfolk. Arriving at Panama on the 19th, she transited the canal the following day and reported for duty with the Pacific Fleet. Continuing her voyage, the warship stopped briefly at San Diego and then headed for the Hawaiian Islands. She arrived in Pearl Harbor on 8 May and underwent a brief period of voyage repairs During the middle part of May, she conducted reconnaissance and demolition exercises at Kahoolawe, Maui, with members of UDT 23. After a short series of refresher training and antisubmarine warfare exercises, she departed Oahu on the 24th for the western Pacific. She entered the lagoon at Eniwetok on 1 June, remained for a day due to a fueling delay, and then continued on to Ulithi where she arrived on 6 June.

On 13 June, Weber departed Ulithi to escort California (BB-34) to Okinawa where the battleship was needed to render gunfire support to American forces subduing the defenders on the southern portion of the island. The task unit arrived oR the island four days later. Following a short time at Hagushi anchorage, Weber put into the roadstead at Kerama Retto for fuel. On 25 June she was assigned to a surface force built around battleships California and West Virginia (BB-48), and cruisers Wichita ( CA-45), Tuscaloosa ( CA-37), San Francisco (CA-38), St. Louis ( CL—49), and Chester (CA-27). Serving as antisubmarine and mine escort for that unit, she patrolled the waters around Okinawa until 1 July, protecting communications and supply lines. She returned to Hagushi for a week on 1 July and departed the Ryukyus on the 8th in the screen of a convoy bound for the Marianas. Delivering her charges safely at Saipan on July 12th she continued her voyage the following day and arrived at San Pedro Bay, Leyte, on the 17th. She spent the remaining weeks of World War II at Leyte engaged in training exercises in preparation for the expected invasion of the Japanese home islands. Fortunately, the Japanese agreed to surrender terms on 15 August, making that operation unnecessary.

Soon after the cessation of hostilities, Weber returned to Okinawa to prepare for the occupation of territory remaining in Japanese hands. She arrived back in the Ryukyus on 21 August and reported for duty with Task Force (TF) 95. She trained briefly with that task organization at Okinawa until 7 September when she reported for duty with TF 55. On 10 September, she departed the Ryukyus with Task Unit (TU) 55.7.1 bound for Japan. She and her colleagues arrived at Nagasaki the following day and began two weeks of service evacuating and caring for former Allied prisoners of war held in Japan. She completed that assignment on 23 September and returned to Okinawa on the 25th. On 7 October, the warship put to sea once more, this time bound for Tsingtao and Taku in northern China with a convoy carrying marines for duty ashore there. A severe typhoon, however, scattered the little flotilla and damaged some of the ships, forcing Weber to return to Okinawa as an escort for the more severely damaged ones. She rejoined the remainder of the convoy just before mid-month and escorted a portion of it into Taku on 16 October. The next day, she got underway for the Philippines with two American merchant ships which she saw safely to Okinawa before breaking off and continuing on to Luzon. The ship arrived in Manila on 23 October and, after discharging about 100 passengers headed back to China. During the month of November she shuttled Nationalist Chinese troops from Hong Kong to strife-torn northern China.

She concluded that duty at Tsingtao on 25 November and sailed for the east coast of the United States that same day. Steaming via Okinawa, Guam, and Eniwetok she arrived in Pearl Harbor on 13 December. On the 16th, she resumed her voyage home and arrived in San Diego on the 22d. Following a week's layover, she left San Diego and set course for the Panama Canal. The warship transited the canal between 7 and 9 January 1946 and headed for New York on the latter date. She entered the New York Naval Shipyard on 15 January discharged passengers, and began her preinactivation overhaul. On 18 February, she departed New York and after a two-day stop at Norfolk, VA., arrived in Green Cove Springs, Fla., on the 23d. There she reported to the Atlantic Reserve Fleet for layup. Placed out of commission by directive in January 1947, Weber remained inactive for more than 15 years. Her name was struck from the Navy list on 1 June 1960, and, a little over two years later, she was sunk as a target on 15 July 1962 by "Bullpup" air-launched missiles.
Weber earned one battle star during World War II.


Weber DE-675 - History

VESSEL TO BEAR NAME OF WEBER

A destroyer escort vessel to be launched May 1, at Quincy, Mass., will be named the Weber in honor of a former Des Moines boy and Drake university graduate, university officials announced Wednesday.

The ship will be named for Ensign Thomas Weber, who was reported killed in the battle of Midway last June, after scoring a direct hit on a Japanese aircraft carrier. Last December he was awarded the navy cross posthumously.

His mother, Mrs. M. R. Walsh of Galesburg, Ill., has accepted an invitation to act as sponsor of the vessel.

Weber, also know in Des Moines as Fred Walsh, was graduated from Drake in 1938. He was manager of the track team and was active for several years in preparations for the Drake Relays.

Two of his aunts live here: Mrs. E. F. Weber, of 2119 S. E. Sixth ave., and Mrs. Ray Maxwell, 1721 E. Thirty-third st.

Source: The Des Moines Morning Register, Des Moines, Iowa, Thursday, March 25, 1943

NOTE: USS Weber (DE-675/APD-75) was a Buckley-class destroyer escort named in honor of Ensign Frederick T. Weber. She was launched on May 1, 1943, and commissioned on June 30, 1943. She saw action in both the Atlantic and the Pacific during World War II, earning one battle star. Decommissioned in January, 1947, she remained inactive and was struck from the Navy List on June 1, 1960. She was sunk as a target of an air-to-surface (ASM) missile on July 15, 1962.


Weber DE-675 - History

This page provides the hull numbers of all U.S. Navy escort ships numbered in the DE series from 400 through 699, with links to those ships with photos available in the Online Library.

See the list below to locate photographs of individual escort ships.

If the escort ship you want does not have an active link on this page, contact the Photographic Section concerning other research options.

Left Column --
Escort Ships numbered
DE-400 through DE-574:

  • DE-400 : Hissem (1944-1982), later DER-400
  • DE-401 : Holder (1944-1947)

  • DE-438 : Corbesier (1944-1973)
  • DE-439 : Conklin (1944-1972)

  • DE-527 : O'Toole (1944-1946)
  • DE-528 : John J. Powers (1944-1946)
  • DE-529 : Mason (1944-1947)
  • DE-530 : John M. Bermingham (1944-1946)

Right Column --
Escort Ships numbered
DE-575 through DE-699:

  • DE-575 : Ahrens (1944-1967)
  • DE-576 : Barr (1944-1963), later APD-39
  • DE-577 : Alexander J. Luke (1944-1970), later DER-577
  • DE-578 : Robert I. Paine (1944-1969), later DER-578

  • DE-633 : Foreman (1943-1965)
  • DE-634 : Whitehurst (1943-1971)
  • DE-635 : England (1943-1946), later APD-41
  • DE-636 : Witter (1943-1946), later APD-58
  • DE-637 : Bowers (1944-1961), later APD-40
  • DE-638 : Willmarth (1944-1968)
  • DE-639 : Gendreau (1944-1973)

  • DE-665 : Jenks (1944-1968)
  • DE-666 : Durik (1944-1967)
  • DE-667 : Wiseman (1944-1974)
  • DE-668 : Yokes (1944-1965). Completed as APD-69
  • DE-669 : Pavlic (1944-1968). Completed as APD-70
  • DE-670 : Odum (1945-1966). Completed as APD-71
  • DE-671 : Jack C. Robinson (1945-1966). Completed as APD-72
  • DE-672 : Bassett (1945-1968). Completed as APD-73
  • DE-673 : John P. Gray (1945-1968). Completed as APD-74


Contents

The destroyer escort completed fitting out and then departed Provincetown, Massachusetts, on 23 July for Bermuda. At the conclusion of shakedown training in waters surrounding those islands, she returned north and arrived in Boston, Massachusetts, on 21 August. Following post-shakedown availability, the new warship left Boston for several days of additional training—in antisubmarine warfare (ASW) tactics — out of New London, Connecticut. Upon completing that assignment, Weber entered New York harbor to prepare for her first combat duty.

Atlantic service as DE-675 Edit

On 5 September, the warship stood out of New York in the screen of a transatlantic convoy. Following a relatively uneventful voyage, she and her charges entered port at Derry, Northern Ireland, on the 16th. There, she remained until the 21st, when she headed back across the Atlantic with a return convoy. She ended that voyage at St. John's, Newfoundland, on 1 October but, soon thereafter, moved to New York for a 10-day availability at the Brooklyn Navy Yard.

In mid-October, Weber escorted a convoy from New York to the Dutch island of Curaçao, off the coast of Venezuela. She arrived in Willemstad on 24 October and remained there five days awaiting the formation of a transatlantic convoy. This group of Allied ships departed Curaçao on 29 October and set a course for the British Isles and arrived in Derry on Armistice Day 1943.

At that point, Weber settled into a routine of escorting convoys between Derry and New York which lasted until August 1944. By that time, she had made six more round-trip voyages between those ports. On many occasions during the period, she and her consorts in the screen made sonar and radar contacts on unidentified ships. While on such occasions they frequently attacked the strangers with depth charges, Weber and her sister escorts directed their greatest efforts to diverting their transports and cargo ships from the paths of U-boats. When doing so, they informed nearby hunter-killer groups of the location of the contacts and delegated to them primary responsibility for offensive antisubmarine warfare. As a result, confirmed U-boat kills eluded Weber but she and the other escorts in the screens accomplished their primary mission of shepherding the convoys safely across the ocean.

On 7 August, she departed Derry for the last time. Her convoy arrived safely in New York on the 20th and, after voyage repairs, the warship began preparations to embark upon a new but brief phase in her wartime career. After the Allied forces which invaded Europe in June established control over the coast of France, convoys no longer needed to travel the long northern route around Ireland to avoid enemy aircraft and submarines based on that coast. Instead, they now could use the shorter and more economical route around the southern coast of England directly to the French channel ports, primary among which was Cherbourg. In September, Weber made one round-trip voyage to Cherbourg then returned to the United States via that route and arrived back at New York near the end of the month.

After a 10-day availability and four days of exercises, the ship proceeded to Norfolk, Virginia to join a convoy bound for North Africa and the Mediterranean Sea. She departed Norfolk with the convoy on 21 October. En route to Gibraltar, she rescued the crew of a Portuguese fishing vessel damaged badly in a collision with Weber during an investigation of the then-unidentified vessel. Soon after the rescue, the Portuguese vessel sank. After landing the fishermen at Gibraltar, Weber continued on to Bizerte, Tunisia, where she stopped on 12 November, and thence proceeded to Palermo, Sicily, for repairs to damage sustained in the collision with the Portuguese trawler. She rejoined her escort group at Oran, Algeria, and embarked upon the return voyage on 23 November. Weber escorted one section of the attached convoy into Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on 10 December.

Pacific service as APD-75 Edit

Five days after her arrival in Philadelphia, Weber was redesignated a high-speed transport and received a new hull number, APD-75. Conversion work on her began immediately. During the following three months, she exchanged her 3-inch battery for a new 5-inch, dual-purpose gun which had proven highly effective both for antiaircraft defense and for bombardment work. In addition, her relatively weak antiaircraft battery was beefed up substantially. Her spaces were modified to provide a place for underwater demolition teams (UDT) and their equipment. Her conversion indicated an impending reassignment to the Pacific theater where the UDT men played an important role in the initial stages of amphibious operations. She completed her conversion in mid-March 1945.

During the latter part of the month, she moved to Norfolk where she practiced shore bombardments and antiaircraft defense. On 14 April, she departed Norfolk. Arriving at Panama on the 19th, she transited the Panama Canal the following day and reported for duty with the Pacific Fleet. Continuing her voyage, the warship stopped briefly at San Diego, California and then headed for the Hawaiian Islands. She arrived in Pearl Harbor on 8 May and underwent a brief period of voyage repairs. During the middle part of May, she conducted reconnaissance and demolition exercises at Kahoolawe, Maui, with members of UDT 23. After a short series of refresher training and antisubmarine warfare exercises, she departed Oahu on the 24th for the western Pacific. She entered the lagoon at Eniwetok on 1 June, remained for a day due to a fueling delay, and then continued on to Ulithi where she arrived on 6 June.

On 13 June, Weber departed Ulithi to escort California to Okinawa where the battleship was needed to render gunfire support to American forces subduing the defenders on the southern portion of the island. The task unit arrived off the island four days later. Following a short time at Hagushi anchorage, Weber put into the roadstead at Kerama Retto for fuel. On 25 June, she was assigned to a surface force built around battleships California and West Virginia, and cruisers Wichita, Tuscaloosa, San Francisco, St. Louis, and Chester. Serving as antisubmarine and mine escort for that unit, she patrolled the waters around Okinawa until 1 July, protecting communications and supply lines. She returned to Hagushi for a week on 1 July and departed the Ryūkyūs on the 8th in the screen of a convoy bound for the Marianas. Delivering her charges safely at Saipan on 12 July, she continued her voyage the following day and arrived at San Pedro Bay, Leyte, on the 17th. She spent the remaining weeks of World War II at Leyte engaged in training exercises in preparation for the expected invasion of the Japanese home islands. Fortunately, the Japanese agreed to surrender terms on 15 August, making that operation unnecessary.

Soon after the cessation of hostilities, Weber returned to Okinawa to prepare for the occupation of Japanese territory. She arrived back in the Ryukyus on 21 August and reported for duty with Task Force 95 (TF 95). She trained briefly with that task organization at Okinawa until 7 September when she reported for duty with TF 55. On 10 September, she departed the Ryukyus with Task Unit 55.7.1 (TU 55.7.1) bound for Japan. She and her colleagues arrived at Nagasaki the following day and began two weeks of service evacuating and caring for former Allied prisoners of war held in Japan. She completed that assignment on 23 September and returned to Okinawa on the 25th. On 7 October, the warship put to sea once more, this time bound for Tsingtao and Taku in northern China with a convoy carrying marines for duty ashore there. Typhoon Louise — a severe storm which devastated Allied forces at Okinawa — scattered the little flotilla and damaged some of the ships, forcing Weber to return to Okinawa as an escort for the more severely damaged ones. She rejoined the remainder of the convoy just before mid-month and escorted a portion of it into Taku on 16 October. The next day, she got underway for the Philippines with two American merchant ships which she saw safely to Okinawa before breaking off and continuing on to Luzon. The ship arrived in Manila on 23 October and, after discharging about 100 passengers, headed back to China. During the month of November, she shuttled Nationalist Chinese troops from Hong Kong to strife-torn northern China.

She concluded that duty at Tsingtao on 25 November and sailed for the East Coast of the United States that same day. Steaming via Okinawa, Guam, and Eniwetok, she arrived in Pearl Harbor on 13 December. On the 16th, she resumed her voyage home and arrived in San Diego on the 22d. Following a week's layover, she left San Diego and set course for the Panama Canal. The warship transited the canal between 7 and 9 January 1946 and headed for New York on the latter date. She entered the New York Naval Shipyard on 15 January, discharged passengers, and began her preinactivation overhaul. On 18 February, she departed New York and, after a two-day stop at Norfolk, Virginia, arrived in Green Cove Springs, Florida, on the 23d. There, she reported to the Atlantic Reserve Fleet for layup. Placed out of commission by directive in January 1947, Weber remained inactive for more than 15 years. Her name was struck from the Navy List on 1 June 1960 and, a little over two years later, she was sunk as a target on 15 July 1962, by AGM-12 "Bullpup" air-to-surface (ASM) missiles. [1]

Weber earned one battle star during World War II.

This article incorporates text from the public domain Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships. The entry can be found here.


0000: Steaming with Task Group 21.7 escorting convoy UC-18 on course 254 degrees T [true north] at 14 knots. On station bearing 300 degrees relative from the guide at 5000 yards. War cruising watches and material condition "Baker" set. No. 1 and No. 2 Boilers in use

0040: Convoy changed course to 279 degrees T

0100: Convoy changed course to 305 degrees T

0630: Exercised at general quarters

0652: Convoy changed speed to 13 knots

0711: Secured from general quarters

0800: USS Burke log: position 38-00 N, 68-56 W

0831: Radar contact reported by USS Weber bearing 285 degree T (true north), distance 12-1/2 miles

About 0900: Executed general quarters upon orders of CTG (Commander Task Group) 21.7. Heavy fog, visibility about 500 yards. CTG. 21.7 instructed USS Weber to divert a merchantman heading into convoy on reverse course of convoy. USS Weber reported unable to identify or divert merchantman, merchantman had already passed him. CTG 21.7 instructed USS Enright not to let the merchantman come between the Enright and the convoy. CTG 21.7 directed USS Enright to sound fog signals.

About 0903: whistle would not operate

About 0904: merchantman sighted one point off port bow on collision course

0905: Full speed astern, hard right rudder

0905: USS Burke log: all ships in convoy and escorts ordered to stop CTG 21.7

0905 1/2: Full speed ahead, hard left rudder

0906: Collided with Portuguese freighter, later identified as S. Thome, on port side aft of engineering spaces. All engines stopped. Three living compartments C-201-EL, C-202-L, C203-L, flooded. Commenced fog signals. Three depth charges exploded at about 300 feet. Listing to port 9 degrees. Freighter lay alongside for about one minute and then backed away. Shoring commenced on after bulkhead of after engine room, forward bulkhead of after steering compartment, and forward bulkhead of compartment C204-AL.

0914: USS Burke log: ordered by CTG 21.7 to go to the aid of the USS Enright, who was rammed by an Portuguese tanker, the "S. Thome", not in Convoy UC-18 in an attempt to divert her from the path of the Convoy.

0921: Tested engines satisfactorily. Port motor had overexcitation

0922: Rudder and steering control tested satisfactorily Gyro checks accurately

0928: Degaussing shorted out and secured

0945: Secured fog signals. Radar out of operation with burned out tubes. One man reported with compound fracture of the tibia of the left leg: Thompson, William G., Y3c USNR, 205 21 39. Patton, Melvin PhM1c administered First Aid.

0945: USS Burke log: standing off starboard bow of USS Enright who is dead in water

0954: USS Weber came close aboard port side, offering assistance

0955 (about): Radar back in operation

1013: USS Burke log: secured from General Quarters

1025: Steaming at various speeds on 305 degrees T

1030: USS Burke log: Ordered by CTG 21.7 to take station #2 Nan, after being relieved by the USS Weber from assisting the USS Enright.

1053: Commenced fog signals

1100: Secured from general quarters

1104: All divisions mustered on station. One absentee: Mims, Carl Augustus, 829 27 56 SF3c USNR. Daily inspections made of forward magazines and smokeless powder samples. Conditions normal. Unable to reach after magazines.

1116: USS Weber took station ahead of USS Enright at 1500 yards

1130: USS Burke log: on station nan

1200: USS Burke log: position 38-17 N, 69-28 W

1200-1600: Steaming as before. Gradually increased speed to 15 knots on both engines

1717: Changed base course to 298 degrees T

1800: Ship's clocks turned back one hour to zone plus 4 time

2000: USS Burke log: position 39-41 N, 71-58 W

2314: Light bearing 35 degrees T, 5 miles identified as fishing craft


Weber DE-675 - History

The USS Enright, Buckley-class Destroyer Escort was named for Lieutenant (junior grade) Robert P.F. Enright, USNR (United States Naval Reserve), Bradford, Pennsylvania, who was killed in action during the Battle of Midway on June 6, 1942.

Pre-Commissioning

She was christened (launched) at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard (current photo WWII photos) on May 29, 1943 as the Destroyer Escort 216 (DE-216). Robert Enright's mother, Mrs. Katherine Enright christened the USS Enright, named in honor of her son.

More than a month before commissioning, a pre-commissioning detail had been assigned at Submarine Chaser Training Center (SCTC) Miami, Florida. This group consisted of all the ship's prospective officers and the key enlisted men of a Destroyer Escort which was to be commissioned about six weeks hence. This small group had the responsibility of molding together a hulk of steel and about 185 men into a fighting unit within the next three months.

Commissioning

The USS Enright was commissioned at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard on September 21, 1943. On the day of her commissioning, she was officially accepted by a representative of the Secretary of the Navy and turned over to Lieutenant Commander Adolfe Wildner, USN (United States Navy), her first Commanding Officer.

Shake-down Cruise

About ten days after commissioning, the USS Enright sailed for Bermuda (map) to undergo an intensive shake-down training period before joining the fleet. This period consisted of all types of exercises including gunnery, anti-submarine warfare with live subs, emergency drills, towing, passing the mail, and numerous others. Upon completion of her training period, the USS Enright was given a final military inspection.

This shakedown cruise will be remembered by all hands as one of all work, and no play. When the USS Enright sailed from Bermuda to join the Fleet she left behind her a good record. During this shakedown period, the crew had changed from raw recruits to a fighting team.

Convoy Duty -- North Atlantic to Europe

Between November 15, 1943 and December 9, 1943 the USS Enright completed two trips as escort to Naval Station Argentia, in Argentia, Newfoundland (map ap). Afterwards she reported for duty with Escort Division 17 (aka CortDiv 17) on December 12, 1943 when she sailed with her first trans-Atlantic convoy to Londonderry, Northern Ireland (map). The crew was eager to kill a German submarine. Numerous stories were circulated about the ship of how wolf packs of German submarines were expected to intercept the convoy. The trip however, was uneventful.

On March 9, 1944, Lieutenant Commander Ejnar Carl Hoglund, USNR, relieved Commander Adolfe Wildner, USN as the Commanding Officer.

Collision with Portuguese Freighter in the North Atlantic

The second trip across in March 1944 was very similar to the first, but the USS Enright's third trip home from Londonderry, she suffered her first tragedy. On April 16, 1944, she was ordered out from the anti-submarine screen to intercept an unidentified ship and divert it from the convoy.

A thick fog reduced visibility to about 500 yards. At 0906 the USS Enright collided with a Portuguese freighter, the S. Thome (English translation "Saint Thomas"). After the collision, the USS Burke (DE-215) and the USS Weber (DE-675) came to the aid of the USS Enright. Only slight damage was sustained by the freighter, but the USS Enright was crippled with a 9 degree list to port, a 65-foot hole in her port quarter, with all living compartments flooded. As a result of the collision, a crew member of the USS Enright, Carl Augustus Mims, SF3/c USN, was lost at sea. The USS Enright sailed into New York and entered the Brooklyn Navy Yard (ap) on April 17, 1944. It required thirty days of Navy Yard availability to get her repaired and ready for sea again.

Return to Convoy Duty -- North Atlantic, Mediterranean Sea, Europe, & North Africa

On May 18, 1944, the USS Enright completed her repairs and proceeded to New London, Connecticut (map) for training with submarines. On June 15, 1944, she returned to New York and rejoined Escort Division Seventeen. On this date, Lieutenant Commander John Howard Church, USNR, relieved Lieutenant Commander Ejnar Carl Hoglund, USNR, as the Commanding Officer.

Under Lieutenant Commander John H. Church, USNR, the USS Enright made one trip to Londonderry and on July 21, 1944 Lieutenant Commander A.B. Bradley, Jr., USNR, took command.

During the summer and fall of 1944, the USS Enright made a round trip to Londonderry, Northern Ireland, one to Cherbourg, France (map), and one to Oran, Algeria (map). It was on this trip through the Mediterranean Sea (map) when she traveled with her largest convoy of approximately 100 ships. This trip was completed on December 2, 1944.

Training with submarines & ship's conversion to 'High Speed Transport'

On December 8, 1944, she once more departed for New London, Connecticut and spent about six weeks there training newly commissioned submarines. At the end of this period she departed for the Boston Navy Yard Annex, Boston Massachusetts (map). Here on January 21, 1945, her classification was officially changed from Destroyer Escort (DE-216) to Auxiliary High Speed Transport (APD-66) and she commenced undergoing conversion. Among her modifications, the USS Enright now carried four amphibious landing craft. These landing craft known as Landing Craft Vehicle Personnel (aka Higgins boats) are identical to those used for the beach invasion of Normandy, France on D-Day.

During conversion on March 3, 1945, Lieutenant William F. Folkes, Jr., USNR, relieved Lieutenant Commander A.B. Bradley, Jr., USNR, as the Commanding Officer.

Headed for South Pacific Ocean

On March 28, 1945, the USS Enright (APD-66), completely converted, left Boston for Norfolk, Virginia (map), where she went through a very short shake-down training period before departing Norfolk for the Pacific Ocean Area on April 7, 1945. On her way south, the ship stopped at Miami, Florida where she was detailed to transport a Naval Air Unit to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba (map), her first assignment in her new classification. The USS Enright was in port at Guantanamo Bay when President Roosevelt died on April 12, 1945.

After leaving Cuba, the USS Enright proceeded straight through the Panama Canal (map) and up the West Coast to San Diego, California (map).

Hawaii to train with Underwater Demolition Teams (UDT)

On April 28, 1945, she left the continental United States for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii (map). The USS Enright and her main than spent three weeks in the vicinity of the Islands of Oahu and Maui undergoing intensive training with UDTs (Underwater Demolition Teams), the precursor to the modern-day Navy SEALs.

The UDTs were training to be among the initial forces to the beaches during the planned Invasion of Japan, scheduled to begin in the Oct-Nov 1945 timeframe. These Underwater Demolition Teams were to launch from the USS Enright using the four Higgins Boats which were installed on the USS Enright during the conversion from a Destroyer Escort (DE) to an Auxiliary High Speed Transport (APD) in Boston, MA in January 1945.

On May 7, 1945, the USS Enright was in port at Pearl Harbor when Germany surrendered (V-E Day, i.e. Victory in Europe Day) ending the war in Europe. On May 16, 1945, the USS Enright sailed around the Hawaiian Islands.

Caroline and Marshall Islands

On May 20, 1945, the USS Enright shoved off from Pearl Harbor for Ulithi (map) in the Caroline Islands. Along the way, on May 28, 1945 the USS Enright anchored at Eniwetok (map) in the Marshall Islands and refueled. On May 29 she left Eniwetok for Ulithi. On June 2, she anchored at Ulithi for refueling and to bring on supplies.

Battle for Okinawa

On June 7 the USS Enright left Ulithi for Okinawa (map) and reported there for duty on June 11, 1945. It was here that many of the officers and men came face-to-face with the enemy for the first time, being part of the Battle for Okinawa.

From June 11 to July 1, 1945, the USS Enright served as part of a naval blockade which formed an anti-submarine screen around Okinawa's west and east coasts as well as the Kerama Retto Islands, near Okinawa. Rings of ships circled the Okinawa at radii of five, ten and fifteen miles. The men could watch the battles on Okinawa, especially during the nighttime hours. The ship was at General Quarters frequently. On June 21, the men of the USS Enright witnessed an enemy plane being shot down. On the night of June 28, 1945 the USS Enright was attacked by a Japanese aircraft, and narrowly escaped being hit by four bombs. After the four bombs were dropped, they fortunately straddled the ship, and exploded upon impact with the ocean.

Philippine Islands & Borneo

On July 1, 1945, the USS Enright was ordered to report to the Commander Philippine Sea Frontier and left Okinawa for Leyte, Philippines (map) where she arrived and reported on July 8, 1945. On July 9, 1945, the ship left for Okinawa again as escort for a convoy. On July 11, the USS Enright's sonar detected a submarine and dropped five depth charges, with no results. Upon arrival in Okinawa on July 12, she was again assigned to duty in an anti-submarine screen.

The USS Enright left Okinawa and arrived in Leyte on July 21, 1945. Afterwards she sailed to and anchored near Calicoan Island, Philippines (map) and Tolosa, Leyte, Philippines on July 29.

The USS Enright then began the first of two mail ship runs. During her first run she arrived in:

  • Cebu, Philippines (map) on July 31
  • Iloilo, Philippines (map) on August 1
  • Puerto Princesa, Philippines (map) on August 2
  • Brunei Bay, Borneo (map) on August 3
  • Zamboanga, Philippines (map) on August 5
  • Madajarda Bay and Leyte, Philippines on August 6

On August 7, 1945, between the two mail runs, Captain John A. Glick, USN, reported aboard as the Commander Transport Division 110, thus making the USS Enright the flagship of Transport Division 110.

On her second mail ship run, the USS Enright arrived in:

  • Cebu, Philippines on August 10
  • Iloilo, Philippines on August 11
  • Puerto Princesa, Philippines on August 12
  • Brunei Bay, Borneo on August 13
  • Zamboanga, Philippines on August 15

The USS Enright was in port in Zamboanga, Mindanao, Philippines when Japan surrendered (V-J Day) ending World War II on August 15, 1945.

The USS Enright arrived in Madajarda Bay and Calicoan on August 16, and in Leyte, Philippines on August 17.

On August 21 she was underway to serve as en escort to a supply convoy. She sighted the convoy about 250 miles from Tokyo on August 27. On August 29 the USS Enright sailed for Leyte and arrived on September 2. By September 7 she was underway for Manila, Philippines where she arrived on September 9, 1945.

Japan

On September 10, the USS Enright was underway for Tokyo Bay, Honshu Island, Japan where she anchored on September 17, about two weeks after V-J Day.

On September 18, a Landing Ship, Tank (LST) hit the USS Enright's fantail six times, there were no casualties. On September 19, she anchored on the outskirts of Yokohama, in Tokyo Bay. On September 20, the USS Enright traveled 180 miles to the north up Honshu's east coast to Shiogama, Japan were she arrived on September 21.

The USS Enright arrived in Ominipo, Japan on October 1 and Sendai, Japan on October 3, 1945, both on Japan's main island of Honshu. The ship arrived back in Ominipo on October 4 and back to Tokyo Bay, where she anchored on October 9, 1945. On October 18, then men of the USS Enright had liberty in the bomb-devastated city of Tokyo. While operating in and around Japan, the ship was under the command of the Commander Third Amphibious Force.

Philippine Islands, China, & Japan

On October 26, 1945, the USS Enright was ordered back to the Commander Philippine Sea Frontier after receiving a "Well Done" from the Commander Third Amphibious Force.

She arrived in Manila, Philippines on October 31. On November 13, 1945 the USS Enright arrived on the Philippine Island of Samar in order to pick up passengers.

She was underway with a full load of officers and enlisted men for Shanghai, China on November 17. While underway she sank two floating mines on November 20, then arrived in Shanghai, China (map) on November 21 where her passengers disembarked. On November 25 the USS Enright departed the Whangpoo (Huangpu) River in Shanghai with more passengers and arrived on the island of Okinawa, Japan on November 27 where the passengers departed from the ship. The next day she departed Okinawa with new passengers, bound for Manila, were she arrived on December 1, 1945.

Return to Atlantic seaboard via Hawaii, San Diego & Panama Canal

On December 2, 1945, the ship was ordered back to the USA and left Manila on that date with a full load of passengers, arriving in Eniwetok, on December 10 where she refueled.

The USS Enright arrived in Pearl Harbor, Hawaiian Islands on December 16 and departed from there on December 19. She arrived in San Diego, California on December 25 and departed on December 28.

The ship docked in Coco Solo, Panama Canal Zone, then went through the Panama Canal on January 5, 1946. She left the Canal Zone the next day bound for Norfolk, Virginia, where the USS Enright arrived on January 11, 1946.

Decommissioning & Atlantic Reserve Fleet

The USS Enright was decommissioned and placed in the Atlantic Reserve Fleet, Florida Group at Green Cove Springs, Florida on June 21, 1946.

Transfer to Ecuador

On July 14 1967, after 21 years in the US Atlantic Reserve Fleet, the USS Enright was transferred to the Navy of Ecuador.

She was modified to carry a helicopter and was renamed Veinticinco de Julio (English translation "25th of July"). Her hull number was changed to E12.

In 1976-1977 she was once again renamed as the frigate Moran Valverde (hull number D-01). Her hull number was changed to DD-03, then DD-02.

The ship was purchased outright by Ecuador on August 30, 1978. In 1989, after over 45 years of service to both the USA and Ecuador, she was dismantled, with her metal parts reclaimed.

Information courtesy of the personal diary of Ivan McCombs, USS Enright sailor and "Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships" (1969).


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Weber DE-675 - History

IOWA PEOPLE AND PLACES GIVE NAMES TO
32 NEW SHIPS OF NAVY, MERCHANT MARINE

Battleships, Frigates, Destroyer Escorts, Cargo Ships
Among Those on Iowa List.

Thirty-two ships launched since the beginning of World War II bear names of Iowa places or people . . . and there are others yet to come. Among these will be one for the town of Carroll (where Waverly’s John Ingals is now county agent) for that place is one of 50 U. S. cities to be used as names of Victory ships after completion of the list of names of the allied countries. In this group the word victory will be used in the name too, as “Carroll Victory.”

The 32 ships are listed in the current issue of Annals of Iowa, the list having been check by the offices of Senator George Wilson and Secretary of the Navy James Forrestal. Of the 32 one is a battleship, one a cruiser, two are destroyers, two are frigates, one is an attack transport, and eleven are destroyer escorts. These are in the fighting force of the U. S. navy. There are also 14 ships built by the U. S. Maritime Commission, two of them listed as cargo ships.

The complete list, as it appears in the Annals, follows:

U.S.S. Iowa IV, Battleship 61, named for the State of Iowa, launched New York Navy yard Aug. 27, 1942 sponsor, Mrs. Henry A. Wallace, wife of the vice president.

* USS Iowa (BB-61), the only ship of her class to have served in the Atlantic during World War II, earned 9 battle stars during World War II and 2 battle stars during the Korean War. She was decommissioned on October 26, 1990, and now is a museum, dedicated August 19, 2012, and is permanently berthed at San Pedro, California. Source: ussiowa.com

U.S.S. Des Moines Cruiser CA-75, named for City of Des Moines, keel laid Sept. 9, 1943, not yet launched Bethlehem Steel Co., Quincy, Mass.

* USS Des Moines (CA-75), the second Naval ship named for the City of Des Moines. She was re-named USS Helena (CA-75) after the city of Helena, Montana before she was launched on April 28, 1945, with Mrs. John T. Haytin, wife of the mayor of Helena, as the sponsor. During the Korean War, she earned the Presidential Unit Citation of the Republic of Korea award and the Korean Service medal with four stars. She was decommissioned June 29, 1963, struck from the Naval List January 1, 1974, and scrapped on November 13, 1974. The ship’s bell, anchor chain and one propeller are on display downtown Helena, Montana. Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Des_Moines

U.S.S. Burlington, Frigate PF-51, named for City of Burlington, Iowa, launched Dec. 7, 1943, sponsor, Mrs. Florence Conrad, wife of Max A. Conrad, mayor of the City of Burlington Consolidated Steel Co., Wilmington, Cal.

* USS Burlington (PF-51) served briefly in the Pacific during World War II, then operated around the Aleutian Islands. She served as a training vessel for the Russians and was leased to the Soviet Navy as EK-21. She returned to the American fleet on November 14, 1949, and served during the Korean War. During World War II she earned 2 battle stars and 5 battle stars during the Korean War. Upon being decommissioned on September 15, 1952, she has been placed in reserve at Yokosuka, Japan.
Source: uscg.mil/history/webcutters/PF51_Burlington.pdfussiowa.com

U.S.S. Davenport, Frigate PF-69, named for City of Davenport, Iowa, launched Dec. 8, 1943 sponsor, Mrs. Ed Frick, wife of mayor of Davenport Leathem D. Smith Shipbuilding Co., Sturgeon Bay, Wis.

* USS Davenport (PF-69) served first on anti-submarine patrol then was converted to a weather ship during World War II. She was decommissioned on February 4, 1946, and sold on June 6, 1946.
Source: /www.history.navy.mil/danfs/d2/davenport.htm

U.S.S. Remey, Destroyer 688, named in honor of Rear Admiral George Collier Remey, USN, of Iowa launched July 25, 1943 sponsor, Angelica C. Remey, daughter of the admiral Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine.

* USS Remey (DD-688) was decommissioned on December 10, 1946 and recommissioned for service during the Korean War on November 14, 1951. Decommissioned on December 30, 1963, she was stricken from the Naval List on December 12, 1974, and scrapped on June 10, 1976. During World War II, USS Remey earned 10 battle stars. Source: www.destroyersonline.com/usndd/info/infdf688.htm

U.S.S. The Sullivans, Destroyer 537, named in honor of the five Sullivan boys of Waterloo, Iowa, lost on the Cruiser Juneau launched April 4, 1943 sponsor, Mrs. Thomas F. Sullivan, mother Bethlehem Co., San Francisco.

* USS The Sullivans (DD-537) “We Stick Together” served with great distinction during World War II, surviving intense combat and rescuing downed aviators, earning 9 battle stars. She served during the Korean War (earning two battle stars), the Cuban blockade and was involved with rescue efforts for the submarine Thresher. She was decommissioned on January 7, 1965, and struck from Naval List on December 1, 1974. Considered to be a National Historic Landmark, she was donated to the Buffalo & Erie County Naval & Military Park, Buffalo, New York, where she now serves as a memorial and is open to the public.

ATTACK TRANSPORT

Former U.S.S. Ansel Briggs, now the U.S.S. Mintaka, Attack Transport AK-94, named in honor of Iowa’s first state governor launched March 10, 1943 sponsor, Mrs. A. V. Bechtel, wife of shipbuilder California Shipbuilding Corp., Wilmington, Cal.

* USS Ansel Briggs (AK-94) was taken over by the Navy shortly after her launch, renamed U.S.S. Mintaka and converted into a Navy cargo ship. She was decommissioned in February of 1949, stricken from the Naval List, and turned over to the War Shipping Administration who renamed her U.S.S. Ansel Briggs. She was scrapped in 1968 at Oakland, California. Source:/www.history.navy.mil/sh-usn/usnsh-m/ak94.htm

DESTROYER ESCORTS

U.S.S. Bunch, Destroyer Escort 694, named in honor of Kenneth Cecil Bunch, aviation radioman first class of Pershing, U. S. Navy, killed in the South Pacific launched May 29, 1943 sponsor Mrs. Leila Mae Bunch, Pershing, Iowa, wife DeFoe Shipbuilding Co.,
Bay City, Mich.

* USS Bunch (DE-694) was converted into a high-speed transport and was redesignated APD-79 on July 31, 1944, and was fitted as a flagship. She served during the campaigns at Leyte and the invasion of Okinawa. She earned two battle stars during her World War II service. Decommissioned on May 31, 1946, she was placed in reserve. On April 1, 1964, she was struck from the Naval List and sold for scrap in June of 1965. Source: www.history.navy.mil/danfs/b10/bunch-i.htm

U.S.S. Durant, Destroyer Escort 389, named in honor of Kenneth William Durant, pharmacist’s mate, third class, U.S. navy, Algona launched Aug. 3, 1943 sponsor, Mrs. Solomon R. Durant, mother Brown Shipbuilding Co., Houston, Texas.

* USS Durant (DE-369) began her service during World War II as a school ship at Norfolk, Virginia. She started for Pearl Harbor in August of 1945, but with the close of the war, she returned to the East Coast. She was decommissioned and placed into reserve on February 27, 1946. Placed on loan to the U.S. Coast Guard on May 15, 1952, she was recommissioned as WDE-489 and served at various Pacific weather stations. On June 16, 1954, she was returned to the U. S. Navy and reclassified as DER-389 and served in picket duty. In June of 1964 she was decommissioned and sold for scrap in April of 1974.
Source: http://ussdurant.org/

U.S.S. Griswold, Destroyer Escort 7, named in honor of hero of Battle of Midway, Ens. Don T. Griswold, U.S.N.R. of Clarinda launched Jan. 9, 1943 sponsor, Mrs. Don T. Griswold, Sr., mother Boston Navy Yard.

* USS Griswold (DE-7) conducted a 4-hour attack on a Japanese submarine off Guadalcanal on September 12, 1944. Although debris and an oil slick arose to the surface, she was not credited with a kill for this action. On December 24, 1944, however, she was credited for the sinking of I-39. She earned 3 battle stars for her World War II service. On November 19, 1945, she was decommissioned and struck from the Naval List on December 5th. Her hulk was sold to Dulien Steel Products of Seattle for scrapping on November 27, 1946.

U.S.S. Hilbert, Destroyer Escort, named in honor of Ernie Hilbert, killed in action in Battle of Midway sponsor, Mrs. Thomas Hilbert, El Monte, California, mother.

* USS Hilbert (DE-742) received eight battle stars for her service in the Pacific, seeing action during the campaigns at the Marianas, western Caroline Islands, Leyte, Luzon, Iwo Jima, Okinawa, and the Third Fleet air strikes and shore bombardment against Japan. She was decommissioned on June 19, 1946 and struck from the Naval List on August 1, 1972. On October 15, 1973, she was sold for scrapping.
Source: www.usshilbert.org/

U.S.S. Kephart, Destroyer Escort, named in honor of Lt. William Perry Kephart, U.S.N.R. of Des Moines, killed in action while piloting a navy plane at Guadalcanal launched Sept. 6, 1943 sponsor, Mrs. Adam Perry Kephert, mother Charleston Navy Yard, Charleston, S.C.

* USS Kephart (DE-207) started her service during World War II conducting convoy escort duty in the Atlantic. She joined the 7th Fleet in New Guinea and was active in many of the campaigns of the Pacific, earning 5 battle stars. She served during the Korean War. On June 21,1946, she was decommissioned and struck from the Naval List on May 1, 1967. Under the Military Assistance Program, she was transferred to the Republic of South Korea on May 16, 1967. She was redesignated “Kyong Puk” and struck by the Korean Navy on April 30, 1985. Source: www.history.navy.mil/danfs/k3/kephart.htm

U.S.S. Mack, Destroyer Escort 358, named in honor of Harold John Mack, LeMars, Iowa, gunner’s mate, second class, U.S. navy launched April 11, 1944 sponsor, Mrs. Gertrude Mack, Los Angeles, mother Consolidated Steel Co., Ltd., Orange, Texas. **Read about Harold J. Mack on another page of this website (link provided.)

* USS Mack (DE-358) joined the 7th Fleet and was engaged in many campaigns of the Pacific. After Japan surrendered, USS Mack conducted air-sea rescue patrol and escort duty. She was placed out of commission on December 11, 1946 at San Diego and placed in reserve. She remained part of the U.S.’s Pacific inactive fleet and was berthed at Mare Island in California until she was struck from the Naval List on March 15, 1972. On June 13, 1973, she was sold for scrapping. Source: www.history.navy.mil/danfs/m1/mack.htm

U.S.S. Myers, Destroyer Escort 595, named in honor of Merton Bernell Myers, machinist’s mate, first class, U.S. navy, of Pocahontas launched Feb. 15, 1944 sponsor, Mrs. Ralph W. Myers, mother Bethlehem-Hingham Shipyard, Inc., Hingham, Mass.

* USS Myers (DE-595) was decommissioned on January 13, 1947 and entered the Atlantic Reserve Fleet. On June 1, 1960, she was struck from the Naval List and sold to the Colombian government where she was used as a floating power station. Source: www.navsource.org/archives/10/04/04105.htm

U.S.S. Reynolds, Destroyer Escort 42, named in honor of Dudley Louis Reynolds, Fort Dodge, Ens. U. S. Navy launched Aug. 1, 1943 sponsor, Mrs. Nora Lou Reynolds, wife Puget Sound Navy Yard, Seattle, Wash.

* USS Reynolds (DE-42) served as an escort in dangerous Pacific area and earned 8 battle stars, a considerable high number for a ship of her type during World War II. She was decommissioned and struck from the Naval List on December 19, 1945. She was sold for scrapping on April 28, 1947. Source:
/uboat.net/allies/warships/ship/1329.html

U.S.S. Schmitt, Destroyer Escort 676, named in honor of Father Herman Aloysius Schmitt, Lt. (j.g.) chaplain’s corps U. S. navy, of St. Lucas and Dubuque, who went down on the Oklahoma at Pearl Harbor launched May 29, 1943 sponsor, Mrs. Elizabeth Buchiet, St. Lucas, Iowa, sister Bethlehem-Fore River, Quincy, Mass. **Read about A. H. Schmitt on another page of this website (link provided.)

* USS Schmitt (DE-676) served in the Atlantic, making 16 crossings without incident. She was reclassified as APD-76 on January 24, 1945 and served in the Pacific. During World War II, she received one battle star. She was decommissioned on June 28, 1949 and struck from the Naval List on May 1, 1967. In February of 1968, she was sold to Taiwan. Source: www.navsource.org/archives/10/04/04076.htm

U.S.S. Sellstrom, Destroyer Escort 255, named in honor of Ens. Edward Robert Sellstrom of Rockwell City, who lost his life in airplane crash launched May 12, 1943 sponsor, Miss Genevieve Dahl, his fiancée, Minneapolis Brown Shipbuilding Co., Houston, Texas.

* USS Sellstrom (DE-255) was part of Task Force 63 bound of Gibraltar. Her service during World War II was mostly in the Atlantic and along the eastern coast of the United States. She finished her service in the Pacific and earned one battle star. She was decommissioned on June 13, 1946 and recommissioned with the U.S. Navy on November 1, 1955. She was decommissioned in June of 1960 and sold for scrap to Peck Iron Metal Works of Portsmouth, Virginia in April of 1967.
Source: www.uscg.mil/history/webcutters/DE255_Sellstrom.pdf

U.S.S. Suesens, Destroyer Escort 342, named in honor of Lt. (j.g.) Richard Wayne Suesens, of Burlington, navy flier killed in action in Pacific area launched Jan. 11, 1944 sponsor, Mrs. Margaret Jane Suesens, wife Consolidated Steel Corp, Ltd., Orange, Texas.

* USS Suesens (DE-342) provided air coverage from transports en route from Hollanida to Leyte. She survived nightly air raids and numerous kamikaze attacks during Operation Iceberg (the invasion of the Ryjkyus). She supported the Japanese occupation forces. She was decommissioned on January 15, 1947 and stricken from the Naval List on March 15, 1971. She was sold and broken up for scrap to the National Metal and Steel Corporation of Terminal Island, California, on June 13, 1973.During World War II, USS Suesens earned 5 battle stars. Source: www.uboat.net/allies/warships/ship/1690.html

U.S.S. Weber, Destroyer Escort 675, named in honor of Ens. Frederick Thomas Weber, U.S.N., of Des Moines, killed in action in Battle of Midway launched May 1, 1943 sponsor, Mrs. Matt R. Walsh, Galesburg, Ill., mother Bethlehem-Fore River, Quincy, Mass.

* USS Weber (DE-675) served as a transatlantic convoy escort, concentrating her greatest efforts in diverting transports and cargo ships from the paths of U-boats. She made six round trip voyages while performing this service. Ordered to the Pacific, USS Weber served as an antisubmarine and mine escort. She spent the final weeks of World War II at Leyte. She earned one battle star during World War II. She was decommissioned by directive in January of 1947 and was finally struck from the Naval List on June 1, 1960. She was sunk as a target by an AGM-12 air-to-surface missile on July 15, 1962. Source: www.hullnumber.com/DE-675

MARITIME COMMISSION VESSELS

* NOTE: Any group which raised $2 million dollars in War Bonds could suggest a name for a Liberty Ship. Source: www.usmm.org/libertyships.html

S.S. William B. Allison, Liberty Ship, named in honor of Iowa United States senator launched March 8, 1943 sponsor, Mrs. Bennet Rose California Shipbuilding Corp., Wilmington, Cal.

* S.S. William B. Allison was damaged by aircraft torpedoes in the Pacific and towed to Okinawa for repairs. She sailed for the U.S. Navy in 1945 as “S.S. Gamage.” She was scrapped in China in 1948. Source: www.mariners-l.co.uk/LibShipsW.html

S.S. Albert B. Cummins, Liberty Ship, named in honor of Iowa Governor and United States senator launched March 23, 1943 Oregon Shipbuilding Corp., Portland, Ore.

* S.S. Albert B. Cummins was scrapped in Seattle in 1961. Source: www.mariners-l.co.uk/LibShipsA.html

S.S. Frank Cushel, Liberty Ship, named in honor of United States senator launched March 23, 1943 Oregon Shipbuilding Corp., Portland, Oreg.

* S.S. Frank J. Cushel sailed for Carras Ltd. of London in the 1950’s as “Avra.” She was abandoned in 1965 approximately 140 miles north of Cochrin when she began to leak. She sank the following day. Source: www.mariners-l.co.uk/LibShipsF.html

S.S. Julien Dubuque, Liberty Ship, named in honor of first settler of City of Dubuque launched Feb. 16, 1943 built at Richmond, Cal.

* S.S. Julien Dubuque was scrapped in Panama City in 1971. Source: www.mariners-l.co.uk/LibShipJon.html

S. S. Leo Duster, Liberty Ship, named in honor or secretary to the governor of Iowa, deceased, of Cedar Rapids financed by Linn Co. drive launched Nov. 21, 1943 sponsor, Mrs. Leo Duster, wife Bethlehem-Fairfield Shipyards, Baltimore, Md.

* S.S. Leo J. Duster sailed for F. S. Bell in 1947 and as “Bat” for Cargo Ships & Tankers, Co. of New York in 1963. In 1966 she sailed as “Deluro” for Apollo Shipping Inc. of New York. She was scrapped in Taiwan in 1969. Source: www.mariners-l.co.uk/LibShipsL.html

S.S. Josiah B. Grinnell, Cargo ship, named in honor of founder of City of Grinnell launched March 4 1943 built at Richmond, Cal.

* S.S. Josiah B. Grinnell was scrapped at Terminal Island in 1966. Source: www.mariners-l.co.uk/LibShipsJon.html

S.S. Samuel J. Kirkwood, Liberty Ship, named in honor of Iowa Governor and United States secretary of the interior launched Dec. 3, 1942 built at New Orleans.

* S.S. Samuel Jordan Kirkwood was torpedoed and sunk on May 6, 1943 by U-195 in the South Atlantic. There were no casualties. S.S. Samuel Jordan Kirkwood’s Master, Samuel Olsen, was awarded the Merchant Marine Distinguished Service Medal by the President of the United States for his meritorious service in the line of duty during the sinking of the ship. Source: www.mariners-l.co.uk/LibShipsS.html www.usmm.org/heroes.html

S.S. W. W. McCrackin, Liberty Ship, named in honor or resident of Fairfield Iowa launched Oct. 6, 1943 built at Portland, Ore.

* S.S. W. W. McCrackin sailed as “Maria G. Culucundis” under the Greek flag in 1947. She was abandoned after sustaining fire and explosions 300 miles northeast of Burmuda in 1962. It is assumed she sank. Source: www.mariners-l.co.uk/LibShipsW.html

S.S. Edwin T. Meredith, Liberty Ship, named in honor of Iowa publisher and secretary of agriculture launched June 15, 1943 built at Richmond, Cal.

* S.S. Edwin T. Meredith was scrapped at Kearny, New Jersey in 1972. Source: www.mariners-l.co.uk/LibShipsE.html

S.S. John H. Quick, Liberty Ship, named in honor of Herbert Quick, Iowa author launched Dec. 13, 1943 California Shipbuilding Corp., Wilmington, Cal.

* S.S. John H. Quick was scrapped in 1969 at Portland, Oregon. Source: www.mariners-l.co.uk/LibShipsJo.html

S. S. Leslie M. Shaw, Liberty Ship, named in honor of Iowa Governor and secretary of the treasury launched Dec. 22, 1942 built at Richmond, Cal.

* S.S. Leslie M. Shaw was scrapped in Baltimore in 1961. Source: www.mariners-l.co.uk/LibShipsL.html

S.S. Henry C. Wallace, Liberty Ship, named in honor of Iowa publisher and secretary of agriculture launched Aug. 15, 1943 sponsor, Mrs. B. B. Hickenlooper, wife of Iowa Governor built at Wilmington, Cal.

* S.S. Henry C. Wallace was converted to a dry cargo ship in 1956 and was part of the fleet for Argyll Shipping Co. of Bermuda. In 1967, she was abandoned after an engine room explosion and fire.
Source: www.mariners-l.co.uk/LibShipsH.html

S.S. James B. Weaver, Cargo Ship, named in honor of Iowa member of congress, publicist and Civil War soldier launched March 23, 1943 built in Wilmington, Cal.

* S.S. James B. Weaver was scrapped at Portland, Oregon in 1965. Source: www.mariners-l.co.uk/LibShipsJ-Ji.html

S.S. Robert G. Cousins, Liberty Ship, named in honor of Iowa congressman launched Dec. 23, 1943 built at Richmond, Cal.

* S.S. Robert G. Cousins sailed in 1947 under the Italian flag as the “Monginevro” and in 1963 under the U.S.S.R. flag as the “Avacha.” She was scrapped at Catellon, Spain in 1973. Source: www.mariners-l.co.uk/LibShipsR.html

The vessels constructed in the United States navy yards come under long established general classifications. Battleships are named for states cruisers and frigates for cities submarines for fish destroyers and destroyer escorts for officers or enlisted men in the navy, members of congress or inventors carries for historical vessels or battles mine sweepers for birds gun boats for small cities sea plane tenders for sounds or bays ocean going tugs for Indian tribes and cargo ships for stars. Maritime Commission vessels are named for individuals.

Source: The Waverly Democrat, Waverly, Iowa, Friday, September 22, 1944

Transcription & Notes in italics by Sharon R. Becker, Jan 2013


Contents

The destroyer escort completed fitting out and then departed Provincetown, Massachusetts, on 23 July for Bermuda. At the conclusion of shakedown training in waters surrounding those islands, she returned north and arrived in Boston, Massachusetts, on 21 August. Following post-shakedown availability, the new warship left Boston for several days of additional training—in antisubmarine warfare (ASW) tactics — out of New London, Connecticut. Upon completing that assignment, Weber entered New York harbor to prepare for her first combat duty.

Atlantic service as DE-675 [ edit | edit source ]

On 5 September, the warship stood out of New York in the screen of a transatlantic convoy. Following a relatively uneventful voyage, she and her charges entered port at Derry, Northern Ireland, on the 16th. There, she remained until the 21st, when she headed back across the Atlantic with a return convoy. She ended that voyage at St. John's, Newfoundland, on 1 October but, soon thereafter, moved to New York for a 10-day availability at the Brooklyn Navy Yard.

In mid-October, Weber escorted a convoy from New York to the Dutch island of Curaçao, off the coast of Venezuela. She arrived in Willemstad on 24 October and remained there five days awaiting the formation of a transatlantic convoy. This group of Allied ships departed Curaçao on 29 October and set a course for the British Isles and arrived in Derry on Armistice Day 1943.

At that point, Weber settled into a routine of escorting convoys between Derry and New York which lasted until August 1944. By that time, she had made six more round-trip voyages between those ports. On many occasions during the period, she and her consorts in the screen made sonar and radar contacts on unidentified ships. While on such occasions they frequently attacked the strangers with depth charges, Weber and her sister escorts directed their greatest efforts to diverting their transports and cargo ships from the paths of U-boats. When doing so, they informed nearby hunter-killer groups of the location of the contacts and delegated to them primary responsibility for offensive antisubmarine warfare. As a result, confirmed U-boat kills eluded Weber but she and the other escorts in the screens accomplished their primary mission of shepherding the convoys safely across the ocean.

On 7 August, she departed Derry for the last time. Her convoy arrived safely in New York on the 20th and, after voyage repairs, the warship began preparations to embark upon a new but brief phase in her wartime career. After the Allied forces which invaded Europe in June established control over the coast of France, convoys no longer needed to travel the long northern route around Ireland to avoid enemy aircraft and submarines based on that coast. Instead, they now could use the shorter and more economical route around the southern coast of England directly to the French channel ports, primary among which was Cherbourg. In September, Weber made one round-trip voyage to Cherbourg then returned to the United States via that route and arrived back at New York near the end of the month.

After a 10-day availability and four days of exercises, the ship proceeded to Norfolk, Virginia to join a convoy bound for North Africa and the Mediterranean Sea. She departed Norfolk with the convoy on 21 October. En route to Gibraltar, she rescued the crew of a Portuguese fishing vessel damaged badly in a collision with Weber during an investigation of the then-unidentified vessel. Soon after the rescue, the Portuguese vessel sank. After landing the fishermen at Gibraltar, Weber continued on to Bizerte, Tunisia, where she stopped on 12 November, and thence proceeded to Palermo, Sicily, for repairs to damage sustained in the collision with the Portuguese trawler. She rejoined her escort group at Oran, Algeria, and embarked upon the return voyage on 23 November. Weber escorted one section of the attached convoy into Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on 10 December.

Pacific service as APD-75 [ edit | edit source ]

Five days after her arrival in Philadelphia, Weber was redesignated a high-speed transport and received a new hull number, APD-75. Conversion work on her began immediately. During the following three months, she exchanged her 3-inch battery for a new 5-inch, dual-purpose gun which had proven highly effective both for antiaircraft defense and for bombardment work. In addition, her relatively weak antiaircraft battery was beefed up substantially. Her spaces were modified to provide a place for underwater demolition teams (UDT) and their equipment. Her conversion indicated an impending reassignment to the Pacific theater where the UDT men played an important role in the initial stages of amphibious operations. She completed her conversion in mid-March 1945.

During the latter part of the month, she moved to Norfolk where she practiced shore bombardments and antiaircraft defense. On 14 April, she departed Norfolk. Arriving at Panama on the 19th, she transited the Panama Canal the following day and reported for duty with the Pacific Fleet. Continuing her voyage, the warship stopped briefly at San Diego, California and then headed for the Hawaiian Islands. She arrived in Pearl Harbor on 8 May and underwent a brief period of voyage repairs. During the middle part of May, she conducted reconnaissance and demolition exercises at Kahoolawe, Maui, with members of UDT㺗. After a short series of refresher training and antisubmarine warfare exercises, she departed Oahu on the 24th for the western Pacific. She entered the lagoon at Eniwetok on 1 June, remained for a day due to a fueling delay, and then continued on to Ulithi where she arrived on 6 June.

On 13 June, Weber departed Ulithi to escort California to Okinawa where the battleship was needed to render gunfire support to American forces subduing the defenders on the southern portion of the island. The task unit arrived off the island four days later. Following a short time at Hagushi anchorage, Weber put into the roadstead at Kerama Retto for fuel. On 25 June, she was assigned to a surface force built around battleships California and West Virginia, and cruisers Wichita, Tuscaloosa, San Francisco, St. Louis, and Chester. Serving as antisubmarine and mine escort for that unit, she patrolled the waters around Okinawa until 1 July, protecting communications and supply lines. She returned to Hagushi for a week on 1 July and departed the Ryūkyūs on the 8th in the screen of a convoy bound for the Marianas. Delivering her charges safely at Saipan on 12 July, she continued her voyage the following day and arrived at San Pedro Bay, Leyte, on the 17th. She spent the remaining weeks of World War II at Leyte engaged in training exercises in preparation for the expected invasion of the Japanese home islands. Fortunately, the Japanese agreed to surrender terms on 15 August, making that operation unnecessary.


Weber History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The surname Weber was first found in Saxony, where the name was closely associated in the mediaeval period with the feudal society that would become prominent throughout European history. The name would later emerge as a noble family with great influence, having many notable branches, and become recognized for its involvement in social, economic and political affairs.

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Early History of the Weber family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Weber research. Another 185 words (13 lines of text) covering the years 1622, 1766, 1779, 1786, 1795, 1804, 1811, 1826, 1839, 1842, 1862, 1878, and 1891 are included under the topic Early Weber History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Weber Spelling Variations

Spelling variations of this family name include: Weber, Webber, Webere, Weberer, Waeber, Weyber, Webern, Weeber, Weiber, Wieber and many more.

Early Notables of the Weber family (pre 1700)

Prominent bearers of the family name Weber at this time were Ernst Heinrich Weber (1795-1878), anatomist and physiologist, who is known for his path finding research on sensation. His brother, Wilhelm Weber (1804-1891), played a major role in constructing the first electronic telegraph. Constanze.
Another 43 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Weber Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Weber migration +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Weber Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
Weber Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Jacob Weber, who arrived in New York State with his family in 1708 and who was the first recorded immigrant of this name
  • Deobalt Weber, who landed in Pennsylvania in 1738 [1]
  • Christian Weber, aged 21, who arrived in Pennsylvania in 1740 [1]
  • Dewald Weber, aged 17, who arrived in Pennsylvania in 1741 [1]
  • Elsbeth Weber, who arrived in Carolina in 1743 [1]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Weber Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Alexander Weber, who landed in Pennsylvania in 1801 [1]
  • Barbara Weber, who landed in Pennsylvania in 1803 [1]
  • Ann Christiana Weber, aged 19, who arrived in Pennsylvania in 1805 [1]
  • Babette Weber, who landed in New York, NY in 1832 [1]
  • Clara Weber, who arrived in America in 1837 [1]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Weber Settlers in United States in the 20th Century

Weber migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Weber Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century
  • August Langlotz Weber, who arrived in Quebec in 1850
  • Caroline Weber, aged 54, who landed in Quebec in 1868
Weber Settlers in Canada in the 20th Century

Weber migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Weber Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Erdmann Gottlieb Weber, aged 27, a landowner, who arrived in South Australia in 1847 aboard the ship "Gellert" [2]
  • Carl Weber, aged 20, who arrived in South Australia in 1847 aboard the ship "Gellert" [2]
  • Christian Weber, aged 60, a labourer, who arrived in South Australia in 1847 aboard the ship "Gellert" [2]
  • Christian Weber, aged 24, who arrived in South Australia in 1847 aboard the ship "Gellert" [2]
  • August Weber, who arrived in South Australia in 1848 aboard the ship "Victoria" [3]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Weber migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Weber Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Mr. Adelphus Weber, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Evening Star" arriving in Dunedin, Otago, South Island, New Zealand on 14th October 1860 [4]
  • Ottilie Weber, aged 32, a servant, who arrived in Canterbury aboard the ship "Rimutaka" in 1885

Contemporary Notables of the name Weber (post 1700) +

  • Gerhard Weber (1941-2020), German fashion designer and entrepreneur, who founded Gerry Weber, a fashion manufacturer and retailer in Halle, North Rhine-Westphalia
  • Wilhelm Weber (1879-1963), German sliver and bronze Olympic medalist for gymnastics at the 1904 Summer Games
  • Jacob Gottfried Weber (1779-1839), German writer on music, composer, and jurist
  • Gottfried Weber (1899-1958), German Generalleutnant in the Wehrmacht during World War II, recipient of the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves
  • Georg Weber (1808-1888), German historian
  • Eduard Ritter von Weber (1870-1934), German mathematician
  • Carlo Weber (b. 1934), German architect
  • Beda Weber (1798-1859), German professor, author, and politician
  • Axel A. Weber (b. 1957), German economist, president of the Deutsche Bundesbank since April 2004
  • Albrecht Weber (1825-1901), German Indologist and historian
  • . (Another 25 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Historic Events for the Weber family +

Bismarck
  • Theodor Weber (1915-1941), German Maschinenmaat who served aboard the German Battleship Bismarck during World War II when it was sunk heading to France he died in the sinking [5]
  • Rudolf Weber (1919-1941), German Musikobergefreiter who served aboard the German Battleship Bismarck during World War II when it was sunk heading to France he died in the sinking [5]
  • Alfred Weber (1919-1941), German Maschinengefreiter who served aboard the German Battleship Bismarck during World War II when it was sunk heading to France he died in the sinking [5]

Related Stories +

The Weber Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Gott segne uns
Motto Translation: God bless us


Watch the video: Weber Skinner AMS 533 (June 2022).